Wisdom Collection

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Search Results: Thanissaro Bhikkhu

  • Tricycle Community 18 comments

    A Glob of Tar Paid Member

    Even though we practice, we continue to fall for pleasant feelings. Feelings are illusory on many levels. We don't realize that they're changeable and unreliable. Instead of offering pleasure, they offer us nothing but stress—yet we're still addicted to them. This business of feeling is a very subtle matter. Please try to contemplate it carefully, this latching onto feelings of pleasure, pain, or equanimity. And you have to experiment with pain more than you may want to. When there are feelings of physical pain or mental distress, the mind will struggle because it doesn't like pain. But when pain turns to pleasure the mind likes it and is content with it. So it keeps on playing with feeling even though, as we've already said, feeling is inconstant, stressful, and not really ours. But the mind doesn't see this. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The Path of Serenity and Insight Paid Member

    There's no jhanafor one with no discernment, no discernment for one with no jhana. But one with both jhana and discernment: they're on the verge of Unbinding. -The Buddha, Dhammapada 372, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu More »
  • Tricycle Community 58 comments

    The Scientific Buddha Paid Member

    According to Buddhist doctrine, there can be only one buddha for each historical age. A new buddha appears in the world only when the teachings of the previous buddha have been completely forgotten, with no remnant—a text, a statue, the ruins of a pagoda, or even a reference in a dictionary—remaining. Because the teachings of Gautama Buddha, the historical Buddha—that is, our Buddha—remain present in the world, we have no need for a new buddha. But in the 19th century, a new buddha suddenly appeared in the world, a buddha who is not mentioned in any of the prophecies. What he taught is said to be compatible with modern science, and so I call him the Scientific Buddha. Today, the Scientific Buddha is often mistaken for Gautama Buddha, the historical Buddha, the real Buddha. But they are not the same. And this case of mistaken identity has particular consequences for those who seek to understand and practice the teachings of Gautama Buddha. More »
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    Looking Inward, Seeing Outward Paid Member

    Sometimes modern people misunderstand Buddhism’s focus on the individual human journey as well as its injunction to people to find out who they are and to seek their own ultimate fulfillment. With our Western suspicions of meditation, of looking within— and, frankly, our fear of being alone—not infrequently, we tend to reject the inward looking of Buddhism as somehow disconnected from the social context and disloyal to it. More »
  • Tricycle Community 22 comments

    Emptiness: All or Nothing Paid Member

    The idea of sunyata (Pali sunnata) or emptiness has been variously understood—and misunderstood—for centuries. Joan Konner's recent book, "You Don't Have to Be Buddhist to Know Nothing," gathers together the thoughts of philosophers, poets, and pundits, Buddhist and non-Buddhist, on nothing, emptiness, sunyata. Some examples: "The nothing is the force whereby the something can be manifested." - Alan Watts "Poetry makes nothing happen." - W.H. Auden "Nothing is exciting, nothing is sexy, nothing is not embarrassing." - Andy Warhol More »
  • Tricycle Community 20 comments

    Tough Teachings To Ease The Mind Paid Member

    People lying in bed ill are lucky because they have the opportunity to do nothing but contemplate stress and pain. Their minds don’t need to take up anything else, don’t need to go anywhere else. They have the opportunity to contemplate pain at all times—and let go of pain at all times. More »