September 17, 2010

Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners

Leigh Wells
Modern historical study challenges much in Buddhist tradition. Yet, as Rita Gross  writes in her article "Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners," understanding Buddhist history can enrich dharma practice by, among other things, demonstrating how Buddhist teachings and institutions are themselves impermanent and contingently arisen. What do you think? How does, or how might, the study of your own tradition challenge, inspire, inform, confuse, broaden, or deepen your relationship to it? —Andrew Cooper

Join the discussion here. If you aren't already a Tricycle Community member, you'll have to sign up to take part in the conversation—but don't worry, it's free and it only takes a second.

Share with a Friend

Email to a Friend

Already a member? Log in to share this content.

You must be a Tricycle Community member to use this feature.

1. Join as a Basic Member

Signing up to Tricycle newsletters will enroll you as a free Tricycle Basic Member.You can opt out of our emails at any time from your account screen.

2. Enter Your Message Details

Enter multiple email addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas.
universal law's picture

As George Santayana reminds us, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it."

pcyap's picture

Dear friends,

Studying the historical aspects of Buddhism would defenitely reveal the truth/reality of the religion itself.
A good example is regarding the decline of Buddhism in India in 11th Century AD. From here one learns about the factors that contributed towards the decline, thereby reminding us to treasure the religion, and never to fall into the same "trap" again !
Of course there are many more instances, you read up than you will know...ehipasiko.
Sadly there are some "extremists" who are all-out to prevent people to learn the historical aspects of Buddhism, saying that this may "destroy" the religion by revealing certain historical truths/facts...

with metta