web exclusive

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    13 Ways of Looking at a Madman: Photos Paid Member

    The following photos relate to the article "13 Ways of Looking at a Madman," from the Spring 2011 Tricycle.                       Red Nail Polish on Gold Painted Stone. This was the OM that Mark called "my masterpiece," made shortly before he entered his final period of decline. A similar stone, created only a few weeks later using the same nail polish and gold paint and depicting the mantra OM-MANI-PADME-HUM, showed signs of a deteriorating mind, the script in that case being barely legible. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Train Your Mind: Work with the greatest defilements first Paid Member

    The Mind-Training Slogans, Slogan #27Each Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha's 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Instruction for Listening Meditation Paid Member

    Try to sit stable like a mountain and vast like the ocean. Listen to the sounds as they occur. Do not imagine, name, or analyze the sounds. Just listen with wide-open awareness. Let the sounds come to you and touch your eardrums. Go inside the sounds and notice their fluid nature. If there are no sounds, listen, and rest in this moment of silence.Notice how sounds arise upon certain conditions and disappear upon others. Do not grasp at any sounds. Do not reject any sounds. Just be aware of sounds as they arise and pass away. Open yourself to the music of the world in this moment, in this place. In your daily life notice the positive and negative habits you might have in your approach to listening. What helps you to listen fully and spaciously? More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Instructions for Questioning Meditation Paid Member

    "What is this?" You can ask the question in tune with the breath: breathing in, I am aware I am breathing in; breathing out, I ask: "What is this?" When you ask "What is this?" you are opening yourself to the whole moment. You are not asking about anything specific. The questioning is open-ended. This meditation is about questioning—not about answering. You are not looking for any answers when asking "What is this?" No analysis, no speculation. You are asking because you do not know. Try to develop a sensation of questioning. Try to remain stable and alert. You are focusing on the question within a wide-open awareness. Experience the pregnant vibrating sensation that the question evokes. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Week 3 Q&A Paid Member

    1.I have long been a fan of your writing, and I wholeheartedly agree that much of what some consider to be essential to Buddhism, such as the doctrine of reincarnation, is unnecessary and a distraction from the Buddha's fundamental teaching.  More »