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    Positive Disintegration Paid Member

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    Facing Loss Paid Member

    We all know what it is like to lose something: love, friendships, identity, opportunity, pets, homes, our hair. And although we know that impermanence is a fact of life, each loss still hits us afresh, almost as if we had never lost anything before. We feel empty, angry, desperate, uncertain—and lost ourselves. It's easy enough to say "This too shall pass," but what about the pain we're feeling right here, right now? More »
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    Schooling Our Intention Paid Member

    How can we engage in action on behalf of earth and not get consumed, not go crazy? We who have aligned ourselves with this effort to transform a civilization so that complex forms of life can continue are faced with something very different from the kinds of challenges that our foremothers and forefathers faced. I'd like to begin by reflecting on some peculiarities of our situation in the twilight of the twentieth century here on planet earth. Six occur to me. First of all, there is the staggering range of the crisis, from the soil to the forest to the air to the seas to the rivers to the spasms of extinction. It's overwhelming for any single pair of eyes. More »
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    Dharma Dogs Paid Member

    These stories present varying views—traditional and new—which, collectively, reflect the ancient dharma debate on whether or not a dog has Buddha-nature. Tina Fields, Pico Iyer, Elsie Mitchell, Darryl Ponicsan, and Tom Robbins give us contemporary views. Griffin Foulk sets the record straight. And in one traditional story, the Buddha cautions that imitating a dog will not lead to enlightenment. Dharma Dogs: Table of Contents More »
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    Meditation In Action Paid Member

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    Rocky Flats Paid Member

    THE WORD "CHARNEL" derives from "carnal"—in or of the flesh. A charnel ground is a place where fleshly bodies are discarded after death, where vultures, jackals, ravens descend to feed upon the juicy raw meat, leaving bloodied severed limbs and bones strewn about. Heaps of bones pile up. The charnel ground is a cemetery, a highly visible boneyard. It is the ritual spot where tantric adepts perform the shamanic chod, or "cutting" practice (a meditation on one's own dismembered body) that initiates the practitioner into the mysteries of death and birth. From a psychological point of view, the charnel ground is that state of mind in which birth and death occur simultaneously. It is a mental process of hope and desperation. You can't ignore it. More »