special section

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    Introduction Paid Member

    Helen Tworkov introduces our special section, Satyagraha: The Force of Truth More »
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    The Psychology of Nonviolence Paid Member

    Gandhi’s lifelong engagement with human imperfection changed the future of politics. More »
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    Homelessness Into Home Paid Member

    India in the sixth century B.C.E. was especially alive with religious adepts going about their business alone or in the company of others. But monastic institutions as we know them, did not exist then, nor did monasteries exist in Buddhism during the Buddha’s lifetime. The pre-Buddhist ideal of the world-renouncing mendicant is already acknowledged in the legend of the “four-signs” which leads to Prince Siddhartha’s renunciation: after seeing examples of old age, sickness, and death,…India in the sixth century B.C.E. was especially alive with religious adepts going about their business alone or in the company of others. But monastic institutions as we know them, did not exist then, nor did monasteries exist in Buddhism during the Buddha’s lifetime. More »
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    Unbending Intent Paid Member

    From Act II, Scene 3 of Satyagraha Libretto by Constance de Jong and Philip Glass More »
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    Clouds & Water Paid Member

    IT HAS BEEN SAID that without monasticism there is no Buddhism. When the first sangha—group of followers—began to grow around the Buddha there was, of course, no distinctly “Buddhist” form of monastic practice. The monasticism that the Buddha developed took into account the needs of his disciples as well as the realities of his culture and society. This responsiveness to the imperative of time, place, and people is still the defining characteristic of Buddhist monasticism. More »
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    Commit to Sit: Seated Tips Paid Member

    Experiment with posture. Sometimes, very slight adjustments can ease discomfort. You might also want to try different types of meditation cushions and benches; or see hot it feels to sit in a chair Use what might otherwise be considered "dead" time (eg. in your car, or waiting for someone to show up for an appointment) to focus your awareness on your immediate experience. If you find it helpful, use your breath as the primary object of concentration. This practice will help you to expand the sense of presence and connection you're developing in formal meditation into your everyday activities. Adapted from Insight Meditation: A Step-by-Step Course on How to Meditate with Sharon Salzberg and Joseph Goldstein, an interactive learning program from Sounds True. More »