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  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Spontaneous Intelligence Paid Member

    Allen Ginsberg was an undergraduate at Columbia University in the early 1940s when he met Jack Kerouac. Together they became charter members of what would become known as the Beat Generation. In 1972, he began studying with Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, and continues practicing in the Shambhala tradition, as well as practicing with Gelek Rimpoche. More »
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    Ethics for a Secular Millennium Paid Member

    In the West, there are many different schools of Buddhism. Where do we find common ground? I would like to say that we are all students of one teacher—the Buddha. One very kind, wise teacher. That is most important. As followers or students of this great teacher, we should take his own life as a model. His sacrifice—leaving his palace and remaining in the forest for six years. He worked hard in order to become enlightened. When the Buddha started teaching, he considered his audience's mentality, their mental disposition, and then, accordingly, gave teachings. More »
  • Tricycle Community 11 comments

    Like a Hair Pulled Out of Butter Paid Member

    Not long ago, your consciousness was wandering alone. Swept along by karma, it took this present birth. Soon, like a hair pulled out of butter, Leaving everything behind, you'll go on again alone. Be careful—a powerful enemy is approaching. Not an ordinary enemy, but an invincible one: death. No plea, however eloquent, can persuade death to hold off for a few years—or even for a second. Not even the most powerful warrior, at the head of all the armies of the earth, can make death turn a hair. Death cannot be bribed by wealth, however vast, nor stirred by even the most enchanting beauty. More »
  • Tricycle Community 16 comments

    Shattering the Ridgepole Paid Member

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  • Tricycle Community 10 comments

    Tonglen: The Practice of Giving and Receiving Paid Member

    TONGLEN PRACTICE 1. Before you begin with this practice, sit quietly and bring your mind home. Then, meditate deeply on compassion. Summon and invoke the presence of all the buddhas, bodhisattvas, and enlightene.d beings, so that, through their inspiration and blessing, compassion may be born in your heart. 2. Imagine in front of you, as vividly and poignantly as possible, someone you care for who is suffering. Try and imagine every aspect of the person's pain and distress. Then, as you feel your heart opening in compassion toward the person, imagine that all of his or her sufferings manifest together and gather into a great mass of hot, black, grimy smoke. More »