parting words

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The Duck Call Paid Member

    The following story is based on a Chinese Buddhist scripture called Bayu-jing, or The One Hundred Parable Sutra. It was originally translated from Sanskrit into Chinese in 492 C.E. by Gunavriddi, a Buddhist teacher from central India. Translated into English for the first time by Kazuaki Tanahashi and retold by Peter Levitt, this story is part of their manuscript, "The One Hundred Parable Sutra: Stories of Ancient Fools for Today." The Duck Call More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Some Things You Can't Let Go Of Paid Member

    In his mid thirties, the artist Frank Moore learned that he was HIV positive. His paintings took a new direction: “AIDS came to the fore,” he explained, “simply because it was affecting every aspect of my life.” When he was very near death, after a long struggle with the illness, Moore painted two works (“Everything I Own I” and “Everything I Own II”) based on the Buddhist mandala mudra, in which the entire physical universe is symbolically offered to the enlightened Buddhas and teachers. Traditionally, the practitioner holds a handful of rice in his palms and releases the mudra, symbolizing the relinquishment of all attachments. In Moore’s two paintings, the rice grains are replaced by the actual objects he held dear: his New York farmhouse, his clothes, his refrigerator. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Parting Words Fall 2005 Paid Member

    A religious act is performed out of good motivation with sincere thought for the benefit of others. Religion is here and now in our daily lives. If we lead that life for the benefit of the world, this is the hallmark of a religious life. This is my simple religion. No need for temples. No need for complicated philosophy. Your own mind, your own heart is the temple; your philosophy is simple kindness. — His Holiness the Dalai Lama From How to Expand Love, © 2005 by His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Jeffrey Hopkins. Reprinted with permission of Atria Books. Image 1: © Don Farber, taken at Bokar Monastery, Mirik, India, 1997 More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The Path Paid Member

    from the Dhammapada More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Parting Words Paid Member

      One day P’u-hua went about the streets asking people he met for a one-piece gown. They all offered him one, but P’u-hua declined them all. Lin-chi had the steward of the temple buy a coffin, and when P’u-hua came back the Master said: “I’ve fixed up a one-piece gown for you.” P’u-hua put the coffin on his shoulders and went around the streets calling out: “Lin-chi fixed me up a one-piece gown. I’m going to the East Gate to depart this life.” All the townspeople scrambled after him to watch. More »