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    In the High—and Hot—Seat In April, the Dalai Lama's U.S. tour included two symposia on science and religion, one at Stanford University in California, the other at Columbia University in New York City. In Ann Arbor, Michigan, he was hosted by Gelek Rinpoche and the Jewel Heart Buddhist Center and received the Paul Wallenberg Human Rights Award. More »
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    AMNESTY TAKES ON CHINA Amnesty International, the human rights advocacy group, is launching a campaign in May to bring greater attention to the atrocities cited by Tibetan prisoners of conscience. Amnesty has evidence of over one hundred prisoners of conscience in the Tibetan Autonomous Region, including Buddhist monks and nuns incarcerated for peacefully advocating Tibet's independence from The People's Republic of China. Many prisoners have been held without a trial in labor camps and jails. Reports of brutal beatings, repeated electric shocks, and prolonged solitary confinement carried out by Chinese officials spurred immediate action. More »
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    In The News Spring 2001 Paid Member

    TIBET MAKES CONTACT: China makes demands At a December 4 news conference held in Dharamsala, India, the Dalai Lama announced that contact between Beijing and the Tibetan government-in-exile has been reestablished. The Dalai Lama told the assembled audience that his brother, Gyalo Thondup, made a secret visit to China in late October and returned with hopes for a more substantial dialogue. Formal contact between the Dalai Lama and Beijing, through the Chinese embassy in New Delhi, was cut in 1993. Informal links were maintained until severed altogether by Beijing in November of 1998. Asked if this most recent development might hold promise for a change in Chinese policy toward Tibet, the 65-year-old Tibetan leader said, “It is too early to say. What is essential is not whether we find agreement or not . . . but that we meet person to person.” More »
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    FIRST PRIZE When Aung San Suu Kyi, under house arrest in Rangoon for the past two years, was named the latest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, the news triggered massive protests against the repressive regime in Burma. Universities were shut down when students demonstrated for Aung San Suu Kyi's release and, in a plea for world attention, Buddhist monks took to the streets carrying big signs in English to, "Free the Winner of the Nobel Peace Prize." (Read the review of Freedom from Fear, a collection of essays by Aung San Suu Kyi).MASS GRAVE FOR MONGOLIAN MONKS More »
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    Winter 1993 Paid Member

    ARIZONA UPDATE In July, jurors convicted Jonathan Doody, nineteen, of a mass murder that shook the international Buddhist community. In 1991, six Thai monks, a nun, a monk-in-training, and a temple helper were shot execution-style at Wat Promkunaram temple in the Arizona desert twenty-five miles west of downtown Phoenix. The conviction was made partly on the basis of testimony from Doody's eighteen-year-old codefendant, Alessandro "Alex" Garcia, who struck a deal with prosecutors for life imprisonment in exchange for his cooperation. More »
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    Do I Have a Witness? More »