contributors

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    Featured Contributors Fall 2012 Paid Member

    Heather Cox, whose artwork appears in “The Fundamental Ambiguity of Being Human” lives and works in New York City. Cox’s art often centers on precisely crafted objects that involve repetition and shifting scale. She uses a variety of materials—paper, pins, erasers, even aspirin and frosting—to address issues of visibility, discovery, and metamorphosis. Each piece invites a closer look. “The viewer’s physical approach is often accompanied by curiosity, confusion, and moments of recognition,” Cox says. “My work is designed to act as a catalyst for these momentary thresholds.” More »
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    Contributors Paid Member

    STEPHEN BATCHELOR, a frequent contributor to Tricycle, is the author of Buddhism Without Beliefs and, most recently, Verses from the Center, a translation of Nagarjuna's work on emptiness. He is the co-founder of Sharpham College in Devon, England, and after serving as its director for four years, Stephen and his wife, Martine, recently moved to Southwest France. JAN WILLIS became a student of Tibetan lama Thubten Yeshe in 1969 and has studied Buddhism for over thirty years. A professor of religion at Wesleyan University, she is the editor of Feminine Ground: Essays on Women and Tibet and the author of Enlightened Beings: Life Stories from the Ganden Oral Tradition. When not traveling she resides in Middletown, Connecticut. More »
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    Featured Contributors Summer 2012 Paid Member

    Jules Shuzen Harris, Sensei, a Soto priest and dharma successor to Roshi Pat Enkyo O’Hara, writes candidly about confronting his own anger and helping others handle theirs in “Uprooting the Seeds of Anger.” He describes his method for defusing anger as “an inventive psychological process” combined with traditional zazen. A Buddhist practitioner for 30 years, Shuzen founded Soji Zen Center in Landsdowne, Pennsylvania, in 2005. In addition to teaching Buddhist philosophy, Zen meditation, and other contemplative techniques, the center offers dharma talks, retreats, workshops, and a weekly study group. More »
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    Featured Contributors Spring 2012 Paid Member

    Chaco Terada, whose photographs appear in “Zen and the Art,” began practicing calligraphy as a four-year-old child in Japan. She learned by observing her father, Soseki Terada, a master calligrapher, and copying his work. More »
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    Featured Contributors Winter 2011 Paid Member

    Spiritual teacher, activist, social critic, poet, Ph.D. in Buddhist psychology, and author of books like Zen Therapy, The Feeling Buddha, and Love and Its Disappointment, Dharmavidya David Brazier has packed several lifetimes into his 64 years. His essay “Living Buddhism” draws on many of them, notably his grounding in Carl Rogers’s Person Centered Approach to psychotherapy, and his longtime Buddhist practice. More »
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    Featured Contributors Spring 2006 Paid Member

    GEORGE JOHNSON ("Worlds Apart," page 80) writes: "I was surprised when Tricycle asked me to go to Washington to write about the Dalai Lama's controversial appearance at the Society for Neuroscience's Annual Meeting. My review of his recent book on science and spirituality in the New York Times Book Review had angered some Buddhists—one called me a fanatic—and I welcomed the chance to expand on my argument that science and religion, Buddhism included, are as immiscible as oil and water. They simply don't mix." More »