History

As a 2,500-year old religion, Buddhism has a rich and diverse past
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    "Gen Sun Tzu at the Allied Front," "Selling Samsara," and "Eat a Cookie, Save a Tree." Paid Member

    Gen Sun Tzu at the Allied Front A Chinese text on military strategy written 2,500 years ago for the Chinese kingdom of Wu is now an indispensable element of U.S. Marine Corps modern warfare. The Corps' commandant, General Alfred Gray, has made The Art of War, by General Sun Tzu, required reading for his men. Shambhala Publications, Inc., recently shipped 10,000 copies of the audiotape to the marines, and the book was a reported favorite among commanders and frontline marines during the Kuwait liberation.  More »
  • Tricycle Community 13 comments

    Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners Paid Member

    I am convinced that an accurate, nonsectarian study of Buddhist history can be of great benefit to dharma practitioners. As a scholar and practitioner, I have for many years worked to bring the findings of historical scholarship into dharma centers in Zen, Vipassana, and Tibetan lineages. While many students deeply appreciate this opportunity, others find the approach unnerving. Modern historical studies challenge assumptions commonly held in Buddhist traditions, though those assumptions differ in the different forms of Buddhism. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Where the Buddha Woke Up Paid Member

    Most are propelled by their devotion. I was propelled by a vague sense of duty and very little effort—I arrived by plane. The effort came only once I stopped busying myself with the outside world. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    What the Buddha Taught? Paid Member

    People have always made sense of the present through understanding the past. Usually, we arrived at the past through a blend of myth, legend, spoken accounts of actual events, and perhaps written records. While historical study is often said to have begun in ancient Greece, with Herodotus and Thucydides, it is only in the modern period that its methods have matured to become our definitive way of knowing, well, history. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    A High History of Buddhism Paid Member

    The war on at least one drug—the psychedelic variety—has been won. In place of the alchemicals that reigned supreme for a momentarily eternal moment, young would-be mind explorers now toke their way through a fractled marketplace of pot, coke, weak acid, heroin, cocaine, ludes, Ecstasy, speed, crack. Set and setting? The set is the fresh curious wary jumpy insecure brain of a bright young kid—fourteen, twelve, ten, the age keeps dropping—and the setting is the schoolyard, the street corner, the stall in the boys’ or girls’ room before homeroom. Or maybe (at best?) it’s a tribal merge at a thumping, flashing rave or a Grateful Dead concert. Always a buzzing swarm. But still hardly the contemplative gardens or paisley candlelit retreats of the first psychedelic illuminati. The heady halcyon days and nights of psychedelia, which once led so many to Buddhist practice, have been efficiently eliminated, reduced to retrofashion. More »