Health

Buddhist practice begins with mindfulness of the body
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    Living Organs & Dying Bodies Paid Member

    Organ donation presents a conflict for many Buddhists. On the one hand, we strive to attain the bodhisattva ideal of compassionate action whenever possible. Nine people die in this country every day waiting in vain for donors. On the other hand, according to some Buddhist teachings, death comes when the consciousness leaves the body, not with the last breath, and it is generally believed that the circumstances of clinical death and the period following it, before the consciousness is released, are critical in helping to determine one's rebirth. According to that view, it is best not to cut into the body for three days following clinical death or risk disturbing the process. More »
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    Village Women Paid Member

    Bringing a Buddhist view to the care of the dying was the subject of five recent interviews conducted by Mary Talbot, Executive Editor of Tricycle, and combined into the following discussion. Joan Halifax, a medical anthropologist and author, began her work with dying people in 1970 at the Miami School of Medicine. She is a senior teacher in Thich Nhat Hanh's Order of Interbeing, founder of the Ojai Foundation, Upaya, and The Project On Being With Dying, and a founding teacher of the Zen Peacemaker Order. More »
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    The Long Shadow Of Good Intentions Paid Member

    In the wake of the hospice and "conscious dying" movement, caring for the dying has been identified as an inspiring stimulus to spiritual development—more akin to a calling than a job. Spiritual methodologies, particularly Buddhist ones, have informed these efforts to bring compassionate care to the dying. And while much has been written about consciously being with the dying, very little has been said about the shadow of this work. More »
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    What Does Being A Buddhist Mean To You? Paid Member

    Ravi RavindraProfessor of Comparative Religion and Physics at Dalhousie UniversityHalifax, Canada In a certain way, psychologically and socially, we humans clone ourselves. Look at teenagers, they all wish to be the same way, to imitate each other. That to me is a more serious issue—how our propaganda, our social-psychological manipulation through the media, actually makes people behave as if they were clones. Work in this field can't really be stopped. This research will be carried on underground—in much the same way that chemical warfare technology and nuclear research have been. There are people with enough knowledge to do this all over the world. Enough knowledge, but maybe not enough conscience. Like the Buddha himself said, we are all driven by fear and desire. More »
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    In the News Paid Member

    PRETENDER TO THE THRONE In our last issue we reported on the outrage of Chinese officials when the Dalai Lama announced that a six-year­ old Tibetan boy, Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, had been determined to be the reincarnation of the tenth Panchen Lama, who died in January 1989. The Chinese government claimed that, under the terms ofa 1792 Qing Dynasty agreement, they had the right to approve the selection of all important lamas found in Tibet. Now the Chinese government has installed its own selection, six-year­ old Gyaincain Norbu, thus effectively creating a rival Panchen Lama. More »