Environment

Preserving our environment and mindful consumption are a part of our practice
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Spirit and Nature: Why the Environment Is a Religious Issue Paid Member

    SPIRIT AND NATURE: Why the Environment Is a Religious Issue Edited by Steven C. Rockefeller and John C. Elder. Beacon Press: Boston, 1992. 226 pp. $30.00 (clothbound) $16.00 (paperback). More »
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    The Path of Recovery Paid Member

    We are headed for a fall as a species, and it seems that all we can do is watch. Some say our imaginations are not big enough to take in the full scope of the catastrophe—the extinction of up to one half of Earth’s plant and animal species by century’s end. Others claim that we can’t help ourselves. We’re sick, addicted to everything from petroleum products to that ubiquitous soporific we call “media.” They’re killing us. Still, we remain stuck to them like glue. Of the two explanations, addiction seems more apt. Our imaginations are better than ever. They tell us that we can invent our way out of this problem, that by digging the hole of human progress just a little deeper, somehow we will come out on top. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    The Garden & The Sword Paid Member

    “Many lives ago I stood where you are standing,” writes W. S. Merwin in his poem “Fox Sleep,” “and they assembled in front of me and I spoke to them/ about waking until one day one of them asked me/ When someone has wakened to what is really there/ is that person free of the chain of consequences/ and I answered Yes and with that I turned into a fox.” The poem paraphrases Case 2 of the koan collection The Gateless Barrier, a case called “Pai-chang and the Fox.” The koan deals with the nature of liberated activity within the realm of cause and effect, and it is one of the most widely commented-upon koans in Zen literature. But you won’t likely hear the new U.S. Poet Laureate talking about it. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    The Burning Present Paid Member

  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Clouding Paid Member

    Traditionally, clouds are symbolic of things indeterminate. Composed of air and water, their essential nature can be attributed to neither element but arises in an obscuring of the two, a betwixt-and-between phenomenon, not unlike human beings, those nebulous creatures who themselves seem caught between realms, floating along between the shimmering horizons of birth and death, here and there, earth and heaven. Buddhist psychology refers to the aggregate of what we call personality as “the five clouds of entanglement.” More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Stop Shopping Paid Member

    I doubt that you need to hear more dire predictions about the ongoing destruction of our natural environment in order to be motivated to work to save it. In fact, too many dire predictions can make us throw up our hands in despair. So I’m not going to tell you how many species a day are becoming extinct, or how soon your home will be covered by melted polar ice. You already know it’s too many and too soon. More »