Community

Living and practicing harmoniously with others is essential to Buddhist teachings
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Letters to the Editor Paid Member

    On Monks, Models & Misnomers More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    In The News Paid Member

    Change Your MindChange Your Mind (CYM), Tricycle’s second annual day of meditation in Central Park, opened with a surprising and auspicious event: a white heron flying above the grassy slopes of Mineral Springs Hill. Only after it circled twice, on the morning of June 4, did Michele Laporte hit a large Japanese temple gong 108 times to formally open a day in which meditation teachers from various Buddhist traditions gave introductory talks and led the participants in silent sitting and Buddhist chanting. CYM is designed to introduce meditation practices in a friendly public setting, free of charge. Participants are encouraged to relax and enjoy the event in whichever way works best for them. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Letters to the Editor Paid Member

    Is the Pope Catholic? More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Just Say Maybe Paid Member

    To celebrate our fifth anniversary, we have chosen to focus on a controversial issue that claims both a complex history and a contemporary revival: Buddhism and psychedelics. Dozens of controversies surround the subject of psychedelics. Some involve legal and medical issues; others, issues of empiricism and religion. Beyond controversy, however, is the historical relationship between Buddhism and Psychedelics (See Rick Fields’ “The High History of Buddhism,” p. 45). For the new Buddhists of the 1960s and 1970s it was the rare bird indeed who came through the dharma gates totally independent of “mind-expanding drugs.” Exceptions exist, but with such infrequency that they affirm the rule, and, according to Jack Kornfield (see p. 34), that includes those Western teachers who are now middle-aged. But the inflated idealism of a mass spiritual awakening through psychedelics faded fast. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    No Place to Hide Paid Member

                                         In people's idealized notions of a monk or a nun, one assumption is very accurate: that it simplifies your life so that you can put all your energy into waking up. Of course, not only monks and nuns are committed to waking up. But for many people, regular life is too distracting—which is to say, they are not at a place where they feel they can follow a path, because their ordinary life keeps overwhelming them or dragging them into passion, aggression, and ignorance. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Letters to the Editor Paid Member

    To the Letter I subscribed to Tricycle because I felt an affinity with a magazine dedicated to a system of thought that appears to transcend dogmatic conflict. However, after reading the Letters section for several months now, I have become dismayed over the constant crabbing, intellectual one-upmanship, and lack of tolerance for others’ viewpoints. I would expect this sort of pedantic behavior from Christian evangelicals, but Buddhists? I can only conclude that too many Americans are bringing their competitive baggage along with their undoubtedly sincere attempt to embrace a system of thought somewhat alien to traditional American religious cultural upbringing. My suggestion would be for these budding Buddhists with inherent combative agendas to return to basics (i.e., the Noble Eightfold Path). And this time, pay attention. Have some compassion. Be nice! Ronald Spatz West Hills, California More »