Community

Living and practicing harmoniously with others is essential to Buddhist teachings
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    Letters to the Editor Paid Member

    Hop Hop Hooray Thank you so much for the wonderful interview with Jeffrey Hopkins [Summer 1996], reading which I was inspired to consider the implications of imaginary sexual contact with “a man” as some functional identification—in mutuality—with that “generic” image as such. Hal PappsSan Francisco, CaliforniaMore of Tricycle’s supposedly white elite liberal readership speaks out: I have received two copies of your magazine and both had articles written by (or about) admitted homosexuals.I do not pay my money to take up the cause of homosexuals. I will not renew my subscription. W. W. HasseyMontgomery, Alabama More »
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    The Formless Field of Benefaction Paid Member

    There was a time when the Heart Sutra evoked associations with Asian monastic rituals, and not Florida hospitals; and when "the great matter of life and death," as the Zen tradition puts it, did not apply to the American abortion debate; and when running an AIDS hospice may have been considered too secular for Buddhist priests; and when Buddhist priests felt obliged to deny their sexuality, all the more so if it was homosexual. More »
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    Letters to the Editor Paid Member

    AUSPICIOUS BEGINNINGS The first issue of Tricycle was superb—a most auspicious beginning. I especially enjoyed Joel McCleary's fine tribute to Geshe Wangyal, Dean Rolston's moving "Memento Mori," and the delightfully unorthodox Spalding Gray interview with His Holiness the Dalai Lama. The quality of the writing was very high and was matched by a marriage of intelligence, wit, and deep feeling, all qualities much needed in the kind of times we now live in. The time has surely come for the years of practice by American Buddhists to bear fruit in a new activism to begin to create a decent, sane, and just society. NICK PEARSON Weston, Massachusetts More »
  • What Does Being a Buddhist Mean to You? Paid Member

    ROHN PARSONS Free-lance generalist in the process of moving back to Japan with his family Charlotte, North Carolina "Some friends and I were discussing Tricycle, Buddhism, etc. I was asked, 'What does being a Buddhist mean to you?' Here are some of our contributions. 'Not staking a claim of being a Buddhist but rather simply being a Buddha-Dharma sympathizer.' 'Nonsectarian appreciation and attempted application of the teachings learned thus far. When sitting, responsibility rests in the lap. Otherwise it rides on the shoulders.' 'Wood comes from trees'. 'Not believing in or necessarily wishing for a speculative "next life" but doing what I can with it NOW!' '22 years of study so far...so what?' More »
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    The Fertile Soil of Sangha Paid Member

    TWO THOUSAND five hundred years ago, Shakyamuni Buddha proclaimed that the next Buddha will be named Maitreya, the “Buddha of Love.” I think Maitreya Buddha may be a community and not just an individual. A good community is needed to help us resist the unwholesome ways of our time. Mindful living protects us and helps us go in the direction of peace. With the support of friends in the practice, peace has a chance. More »
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    Buddhism(s)? Paid Member

    EVERYBODY KNOWS there is really no such thing as Hinduism. The name is derived from an ancient word for sea, sindhu, used also for the Indus River. Persians living to the west of the Indus modified it to hind, and used it to refer to the land of the Indus valley. Eventually, Muslims used hindu to refer to the native peoples of South Asia. It was not a term that "Hindus," however, used to refer to themselves. In the nineteenth century, officers of the British Raj began to use the word Hinduism, especially for purposes of their census, to refer to a purported system of religious beliefs and practices of non-Muslim, non-Jain, non-Sikh, non-Christian, non-Parsi, non-Jewish Indians (Buddhism had disappeared from India centuries before). More »