Community

Living and practicing harmoniously with others is essential to Buddhist teachings
  • Don't Just Sit There, Do Something Paid Member

    Ever since Western converts began adopting Buddhist traditions, their community has sought a balance between the quest for personal peace and tranquility and the sense of social engagement that has sometimes expressed itself, most recently on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, with the well-worn activists’ phrase No justice, no peace. More »
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    Lost in Memory Paid Member

    American CanyonBy Amarnath RavvaKaya Press, 2014180 pp.; $23.95 paper Amarnath Ravva’s snake was asleep. His mother’s seer, Sharma, who sensed from another continent the imbalance in Ravva's body, diagnosed him. Sharma prescribes a visit to Livemore, California, for a homam—a Hindu ritual involving consecrated fire and offerings to the god Agni—where prayer is chanted; 1,001 ghee offerings are made; and Ravva’s name is written in Sanskrit on a piece of paper in which the pujari, or priest, seals ashes from the fire. More »
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    The Tie That Need Not Bind Paid Member

    I am so filled with thirst to be involved with people that there is no room in me for judging whether a person is good or evil, beautiful or ugly, right or wrong. This is not the result of some concept such as “one lives to love and be loved.” Any concept, faith, or “ism” cannot separate me from other people. My spirit shines with the heart/mind of embracing all beings. Without logic or argument, I only want to embrace everyone. My work of spreading the dharma is nothing but the expression of this heart/mind. —Haya Akegarasu (1877–1954) More »
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    An Interview with Paul McBain Paid Member

    Profession: Student/FilmmakerAge: 31 Location: Chicago, Illinois More »
  • People's Climate March Paid Member

    “I know that my path to enlightenment will only come from being connected to the world around me,” Njeri Matheu, a member of Brooklyn Zen Center, explained as she marched through the streets of midtown Manhattan. “It's not just about being centered inside; it's about being connected to your world.” Around her, an estimated 700 other Buddhists belonging to over 35 Buddhist organizations held signs and banners with environmental slogans as they walked, keeping rhythm with meditation bells. This Buddhist contingent contributed to the estimated 400,000 protesters who participated People’s Climate March, the largest march of its kind in history, on September 21. More »
  • What Does Being a Buddhist Mean to You? Paid Member

    "The Buddha Way is the ultimate marriage—great intimacy, no separation, diversity, compassion—in an ever-changing world."Sally Jinga DrummondPainterGermantown, NYMarried thrity-six years  "It's been only positive in terms of practice. It feels great to be good friends with a Buddhist, my husband, and encouraging to wake up in the morning next to him."Carol Chikan MuddCosta Mesa, CAMarried sixteen years  More »