vajrayana

  • This Week in Retreat: Questions on Buddha Nature and Ritual Paid Member

    This week in Rita Gross's ongoing Tricycle Retreat, Buddhist History for Buddhist Practioners, Rita discusses what parts of the Buddhist teachings were unique ideas of the Buddha, as opposed to ideas that already existed in spiritual traditions of his day. She explains that these unique innovations can be broken down into five categories: The Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path, the lack of a permanent separate self/soul, egolessness, dependent origination, and the purpose of meditation. In response, one participant writes, More »
  • Remembering the 16th Karmapa Paid Member

    In the 10th century AD, at the great Buddhist monastic university Nalanda in Bihar, India (which is currently being rebuilt), there was a monk named Naropa who was of the school's best and brightest students. Despite his academic standing, upon hearing of a great yogi named Tilopa, Naropa immediately felt great devotion to him and, wanting to learn on a deeper, more experiential level, resolved to leave the university behind in order to seek him. After a great search and many hardships, Naropa found Tilopa and is said to have attained a very high level of spiritual realization. More »
  • Be a child of illusion Paid Member

    Each Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha's 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Following each commentary Judy offers us a weekly practice. Here is Slogan 6 (each slogan provides links to the previous slogans, including a two-part discussion of their history and use in practice). I've been following along each week myself—a good way to stay grounded—rather ungrounded!—in my practice. 6. In postmeditation, be a child of illusion. Practice can be divided into two: meditation and postmeditation. More »