Tibet

  • Chinese Communist Party seeks to intensify reforms in Tibetan monasteries Paid Member

    VIA Phayul.com, Dharamsala, August 17: In what appeared to be a fresh effort to further tighten government’s control on Tibet's influential religious institutions, a top leader of the Communist Party of China has called for reforms in Buddhist monasteries by appointing monks and nuns who are "politically reliable". In a move that could be seen as part of Chinese Communist regime’s larger campaign to weed out pro-Dalai Lama elements in the Buddhist clergy, Du Qinglin, head of the United Front Work Department of the Party's Central Committee - the body tasked specifically to handle the Tibet talks - said greater efforts must be made to implement “democratic management in Tibetan Buddhist monasteries.” More »
  • Tibetan writer called to trial Paid Member

    A forty-seven-year-old Tibetan writer, accused of "splittism," will stand trial next month in Xining, the provincial capital of Qinghai Province on the Tibetan Plateau. Splittism is a charge most Tibetan critics of Chinese rule face when arrested. The writer, Tragyal, who writes under the name Shogdung, was arrested following the publication of The Line Between Sky and Earth, which, according to the New York Times, is a "painstakingly written indictment of Chinese rule and a call for a 'peaceful revolution' against what Mr. Tragyal describes as Beijing’s heavy-handed governing style." More »
  • China's pollution worsens, prominent Tibetan conservationist arrested Paid Member

    Four years ago, China overtook the US to become the world's biggest emitter of carbon dioxide. Now International Energy Agency (IEA) has announced that China tops the list as the biggest energy consumer in the world. What does all this mean? Lots and lots of pollution. A report in yesterday's New York Times painted a dispiriting portrait of China's environmental problems: More »
  • Chinese migrants and money pouring into Tibet Paid Member

    Military truck convoys and high-altitude speed trains are bringing Chinese migrants and money into remote areas of Tibet as part of an effort to increase wealth and tourism in the area. From the New York Times: Han Chinese workers, investors, merchants, teachers and soldiers are pouring into remote Tibet. After the violence that ravaged this region in 2008, China’s aim is to make Tibet wealthier---and more Chinese. Chinese leaders see development, along with an enhanced security presence, as the key to pacifying the Buddhist region. The central government invested $3 billion in the Tibet Autonomous Region last year, a 31 percent increase over 2008. Tibet’s gross domestic product is growing at a 12 percent annual rate, faster than the robust Chinese national average. More »
  • Tradition Transformed Paid Member

    Contemporary Tibetan art has finally come to New York City. The Rubin Museum is currently hosting "Tradition Transformed: Tibetan Artists Respond," the first ever exhibition of contemporary Tibetan art in NYC. From the Rubin: The exhibition began with an invitation: the nine artists were asked to submit new and recent works that served as the show's formative voice and inspired the curatorial response. Specific works by the same artists were then selected from New York private collections in order to complement the new pieces and highlight each artist's range. More »