Tibetan Buddhism

  • Become Aware of Awareness Paid Member

    The goal of attention, or shamatha, practice is to become aware of awareness. Awareness is the basis, or what you might call the “support,” of the mind. It is steady and unchanging, like the pole to which the flag of ordinary consciousness is attached. When we recognize and become grounded in awareness, the “wind” of emotion may still blow. But instead of being carried away by the wind, we turn our attention inward, watching the shifts and changes with the intention of becoming familiar with that aspect of consciousness that recognizes Oh, this is what I’m feeling, this is what I’m thinking. As we do so, a bit of space opens up within us. More »
  • More tools to navigate your way through the rich world of Tibetan art Paid Member

    Yesterday I linked to a page that shows you how to identify and understand the deities of the Tibetan pantheon. More »
  • How to Identify A Tibetan Deity Paid Member

    Jeff Watt at Himalayan Art Resources knows everything about Tibetan Buddhist iconography. I sometimes call him and ask questions like, "Who is that odd-looking deity?" Or, with urgent requests like, "We need an image, and we need it now." I sometimes try his patience, too, so I have to make sure I sort of know what I'm talking about before I call him, and still, it's hard to sound halfway intelligent: the complex landscape of Tibetan iconography is no easy thing to navigate. But those days may be over. More »
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    Daily Dharma - Being Natural is Very Special Paid Member

    Wherever we are, whatever we're doing, what we need to acknowledge is something natural. Something uncontrived. The uncontrived state is actually very special. Being natural is very special. And the natural way is actually already with us, in or out of retreat, but we just don't acknowledge it. If you just acknowledge your natural way, that's enough, good enough. It's like the cow peeing in the field. It just stands there and pees. Every day, it just pees, quite naturally. More »
  • Why I Became a Buddhist Monk, Why I Quit and What I Learned Paid Member

    Former Tibetan Buddhist monk Stephen Schettini, now director of TheQuietMind.org, explains his teaching this way: I don't promise perfect peace, earth-shattering insight or transcendental breakthroughs. On the contrary, I ask my students to work hard, and especially to beware their own expectations. We're all twenty-first century grownups and as much as we want to believe in easy solutions and magical formulas we know perfectly well that a down-to-earth approach will pay off more than all the mantras, visualizations and promises of enlightenment on the world wide web. Does this sound like someone who's been disillusioned by traditional Buddhist practices? I'd say so. More »
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    Daily Dharma, August 28th, 2009 - Can't Take It with You Paid Member

    We came into the world without husband, wife, friend, or companion. We may have many friends and acquaintances at the moment, and perhaps many enemies, too, but as soon as death falls upon us we shall leave all of them behind, like a hair pulled out of a slab of better. –Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche, from "Like a Hair Pulled Out of Butter," Tricycle, Fall 1997 Read the complete article. Follow us on Twitter. More »