Tibetan Buddhism

  • Weekend Challenge: Train Your Mind Paid Member

    "Train your mind" may seem to be an almost unmanageable command. Many of us are controlled by our minds rather than the other way around. We know to try to not be anxious or worried, but these feelings keep us awake at night. Likewise, we may not wish to judge others but many of us do regardless. We often feel too powerless to control our minds. In the words of Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, the son of Chögyam Trungpa, “our minds seem so inflexible.” The problem with this is, as he points out, “A society of hard and inflexible minds is a society that is incapable of nurturing the flowers of love and compassion.” Yet the goal of trained mind is not as unachievable as we may at first be lead to believe. More »
  • Acharya Judy Lief on Working with Labels and Reactions Paid Member

    Every Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, a senior teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha’s 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa’s Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche’s commentaries on the lojong teachings. Each entry includes a practice. See the previous slogans and commentaries here. 8. Three objects, three poisons, and three seeds of virtue. More »
  • Blogwatch: Musings Paid Member

    I recommend checking out Musings by author, teacher, translator—and blogger—Ken McLeod.  An excellent teacher, McLeod does just this in the vast majority of his blog: He teaches.  Through simple practice tips and personal reflections, McLeod strikes an impressive balance between simplicity and depth which makes his blogs both instantly accessible as well as very useful.  It is very practice-oriented and can serve as a great online resource for any regular meditator with an internet connection. More »
  • Wrong, wrong, wrong! Paid Member

    Himalayan Art Resources' Jeff Watt couldn't be more emphatic: Art for art's sake is as old as Tibet—in fact, far older. So you can imagine how ticked off the Tibetan iconography expert was when he read this at artdaily.org: There is no Tibetan equivalent for the word “art” as it is known in the West. The closest approximation is lha dri pa, literally, “to draw a deity.” Traditionally, neither the Tibetan language nor the Tibetan cultural framework has recognized art for art’s sake, and an artist’s efficacy rests in his ability to precisely replicate an established visual language and portray the essence of a particular deity. (Artdaily.org). More »
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    Melodala draws mandalas while you listen to music Paid Member

    Buddhist iPhone apps are all the rage—at least among Buddhists with iPhones or iPod Touches. So to these people we say meet Melodala, "an iPhone app inspired by Tibetan Buddhism." Plug in some settings and color preferences and it makes pretty roundish pictures while you listen to music. If this is your thing, you can find Melodala here. It costs $2.99. More »