Tibetan Buddhism

  • Nice art, troubled history: Dorje Shugden Paid Member

    Issues around the worship of the Tibetan deity Dorje Shugden have been the source of much conflict ever since the deity and its associated practices were adopted by the Gelug sect of Tibetan Buddhism. But it was not the Gelugs who inducted the deity into the Tibetan Buddhist pantheon. In fact, it was only in the early 20th century that Gelugs adopted practices linked to Dorje Shugden. Previously, such practices were primarily associated with the Sakya sect. More »
  • Dying with Confidence at the Tricycle Book Club Paid Member

    How should we prepare to die? Many of us don’t know where to begin when it comes to death. It scares us. We understand so many things and death remains a great mystery. In some ways, of course, death will always be a mystery—how could anybody ever really know? However, it should also be said that, due to our steadfast refusal to talk about it, death is more mysterious than it has to be. At the Tricycle office we sometimes make jokes about how our readers’ least favorite tweets and blog posts are those that mention death. Why can’t we talk about this? Even though we joke, this is quite serious. Without a deep awareness of death how can one be truly confident about living?   More »
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    Ogyen Trinley Dorje, the 17th Karmapa, writes about Gene Smith Paid Member

    Ogyen Trinley Dorje writes: From the time the Buddhadharma arrived in Tibet, the translation and production of texts formed a key area of activity, mobilizing and shaping Tibetan culture. During the mass exodus into exile in the mid-20th century, Tibetans could easily carry the meaning of the texts written in their hearts but had to carry the books on their own backs. In this process, and in the subsequent years of exile and during the Cultural Revolution within Tibet, texts and wood blocks were scattered, and painfully many were lost. In such an era, to dedicate one’s life to seeking out, preserving, publishing and digitizing Tibet’s vast textual heritage, as Gene Smith did, is a kindness that cannot be expressed in words. I do not believe it unfair to say that his life’s accomplishments follow in the example of the great Dharma kings of Tibet. More »
  • The Magic Life of Milarepa Paid Member

    A few weeks ago I was looking through the first issue of Tricycle and I came across a mention of The Magic Life of Milarepa, a comic book about the great 11th century Tibetan saint illustrated and written by Dutch artist Eva Van Dam.  *For quick links to further reading on Milarepa, see his Himalayan Art Resources or Wikipedia pages. More »
  • The Dalai Lama beats out Barack Obama and Lady Gaga on Forbes's list of "most influential Twitter celebrities" Paid Member

    What do the Dalai Lama and Rick Warren, the megachurch evangelist, have in common? They are the only religious leaders to make Forbes's "Top 20 Most Influential Twitter Celebrities." The Dalai Lama--whose office set up a Twitter account in February--ranked #5, beating the likes of President Obama, singer Lady Gaga, and comedian Conan O'Brien—who all placed lower on the list. To generate the top 20 list, Forbes hired the research firm Klout to help determine the influence of Twitter celebs. From Forbes: More »
  • A visit from Lama Jhampa Thaye Paid Member

    We were very pleased today to receive a visit from the scholar and meditation teacher Lama Jampa Thaye, who was trained in both the Sakya and Kagyu lineages and authorized as a lama by his two masters, Karma Thinley Rinpoche and H.H. Sakya Trizin. He was accompanied by his daughter who is a relatively new New York resident. The lama himself lives in London (though his busy teaching schedule takes him all over the world.) His most recent book is Rain of Clarity—available here. More »