Politics

  • Buddha Buzz: Religious Freedom, Swastikas, and the Giving High Paid Member

    We're starting off this week's Buddha Buzz with a pretty clear example of religious intolerance in Hudson, Wisconsin. Don Chering, a Buddhist, put up an American flag and a string of Tibetan prayer flags on the day that his son left for U.S. Army basic training. The flags stretch across the front of his house and over his garage door. Soon, his landlady contacted him with an order from the Homeowners Association in charge of the housing complex where Chering lives to remove the flags (it's unclear as of yet if they are requesting that the American flag be removed as well).  More »
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    Buddha Buzz: Bartending Monks and Hungary's New Constitution Paid Member

    On January 1, Hungary's new constitution was passed—one that many say removes a system of checks and balances on the central government and also endangers constitutional rights.  One of these violations of constitutional rights was a withdrawal of official recognition for over 300 religious denominations that exist in Hungary. In fact, only 14 organizations—3 Jewish and the rest Christian—were granted official status (you can read the full list here, on page 17). This means that all other religions, including Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and many other Jewish and Christian denominations have lost their tax exemptions and state subsidies.  More »
  • Starting Points Paid Member

    This essay, "Starting Points," by Tricycle's Features Editor Andrew Cooper, first appeared in Turning Wheel in 1993. Cooper uses the two-year anniversary of the beating of Rodney King as his own starting point to explore the birthplaces of racism and how to approach the predominant whiteness of American Buddhist communities. "Starting Points" reminds us of the first question that we must ask ourselves in the process of making our sanghas more inclusive: Where do we start? Though the essay is almost two decades old, it's a question that in many ways, we're still asking. More »
  • Occupy the Moment: A 99¢ Book for the 99% Paid Member

    Rick Heller, editor of the online magazine The New Humanism, self-identified secular Buddhist, and Occupy Boston activist, recently released the eBook, Occupy the Moment: A Mindful Path to a New Economy. It combines Buddhist teachings with neuroscience to frame a discussion of mindful activism and the Occupy movement. Heller specifically focuses on the three poisons—greed, hatred, and delusion—and how an understanding of all of them, and in particular, greed, can shape how we go about changing society for the better. From Occupy the Moment's introduction: More »
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    Václav Havel (1936 – 2011) Paid Member

                                         Václav Havel (1936 – 2011)Václav Havel was a leader who brought his deep moral, spiritual, and intellectual concerns to bear in the realm of politics. In an article entitled "To Uphold the World," the author Bruce Rich quoted Havel as follows. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Honesty, Poetry, and Exile Paid Member

    Barbara O'Brien's post on Tuesday, "Deep Honesty," made me think about all of honesty's different forms: honesty as a precept, honesty as a worldview, honesty as a tool for empowerment...and its less welcome forms too, like honesty as an unwelcome guest knocking on your door in the middle of the night when you're not quite ready to receive it. On all of these O'Brien writes, Speaking truth comes from a practice of truthfulness, or deep honesty. One of the things I first appreciated about Zen practice is that it requires self-honesty. Whatever shtick has gotten you through life is revealed to be a hindrance instead of a crutch, and the myriad little lies and rationalizations we tell ourselves about ourselves fall away. (And they're still falling away.) More »