Meditation

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    Daily Dharma, August 3rd, 2009 - When is the Perfect Time to Practice? Paid Member

    The perfect time to practice is right now—not tomorrow or next week or when you're less busy, but right now. Nothing is lacking now: The dharma is wide open. All the "if-onlys" in the world are just excuses that keep you from meeting this moment. - Dairyu Michael Wenger, Tricycle Winter 2004 More »
  • Feeding Your Demons Paid Member

    We all have demons. They're not nasty ghouls or goblins or things with horns—they're worse. In "Feeding Your Demons," from the Summer 2008 Tricycle, Tsultrim Allione describes them this way: Demons are our obsessions and fears, feelings of insecurity, chronic illnesses, or common problems like depression, anxiety, and addiction. Feeding our demons rather than fighting them may seem to contradict the conventional approach of attacking and attempting to eliminate that which assails us, but it turns out to be a remarkable alternative and an effective path to liberation from all dichotomies. More »
  • Daily Dharma, July 24th, 2009 - Sogyal Rinpoche on Meditation Paid Member

    When I meditate, I am always inspired by this poem by Nyoshul Khenpo: Rest in natural great peace This exhausted mind Beaten helpless by karma and neurotic thought, Like the relentless fury of the pounding waves In the infinite ocean of samsara. Rest in natural great peace. Above all, be at ease, be as natural and spacious as possible. Slip quietly out of the noose of your habitual anxious self, release all grasping, and relax into your true nature. Think of your ordinary emotional, thought-ridden self as a block of ice or a slab of butter left out in the sun. If you are feeling hard and cold, let this aggression melt away in the sunlight of your meditation. Let peace work on you and enable you to gather your scattered mind into the mindfulness of Calm Abiding, and awaken in you the awareness and insight of Clear Seeing. More »
  • Who's the happiest man in the world? Paid Member

    According to an opinion piece by Daniel Goleman in this morning's New York Times ("Sitting Quietly, Doing Something"), Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche is. And the reason is no secret: So how did he get that way? Apparently, the same way you get to Carnegie Hall. Practice. Buddhist meditation practice, that is. According to Goleman, Mingyur Rinpoche is an "Olympic-level meditator," logging more than 10,000 hours on the cushion. Goleman cites neuroscientist Richard Davidson's studies on meditation's effect on the brain to explain why these spiritual athletes are so cheerful. There is a strong correllation, Goleman explains, between committed meditation practice and increased activity in the areas of the brain associated with positive moods: The more lifetime hours of practice, the greater the increases tended to be. More »
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    Daily Dharma, July 16th, 2009 - Attention to Breathing Paid Member

    Traditionally, in the meditation instructions handed down from the Buddha, attention to breathing is understood as part of the overall practice of mindfulness of body. Sit here and feel the body breathing in (however short or long the breath, let it be that way) and breathing out (don't try to make the breath deeper or longer, just let it be however it is). Gaylon Ferguson, Natural Wakefulness (Shambhala Publications) Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Overcoming Anxiety Paid Member

    I understand that long-term meditation is supposed to help squash more quickly those moments of anguish that arise, but for those of us– the vast majority, I imagine– who are not advanced practitioners, how do we handle the regular hiccups in life that threaten to cause damage? How do we manage our anger when someone elbows us on the street? Or when someone close to us treats us poorly? Or simply when that unexplainable bubble of anxiety rises in our throats? When you can’t just stop and meditate, what do you do? More »