Humor

  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    A Bit of Satire Paid Member

    If you’ve followed the recent round of Zen scandals, you might enjoy this short satirical piece from Tricycle’s features editor, Andrew Cooper. If some of the references don’t add up, you can start here or here to find out more. ---- Sounds Vaguely Familiar More »
  • Turtles all the way down Paid Member

    This comic, recently sent my way by a good friend and former Tricycle intern, seemed worth sharing. I appreciate the message and the turtle instantly reminded me of a passage from David Loy's The World is Made of Stories, recently reviewed by Alan Senuake for Tricycle.From The World is Made of Stories: More »
  • Fake Monks and Buddha Thievery Paid Member

    Has anybody read the Bangkok Post lately? Seems like the paper is absolutely determined to expose all Buddhist fraud and thievery these days. First, in "Bogus Monks exploit Buddhism," we learn of foreign monks immigrating to Thailand in order to illegally ordain as monks and beg residents for alms. The Post reports: More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    A Sutra Noir: The Big Awakening Paid Member

    Nearly thirty years ago, Tricycle’s features editor, Andrew Cooper, wrote a fine piece of Buddhist humor that made the rounds in various Buddhist publications. It is an imagined Buddhist sutra told in the voice of a hard-boiled detective of the Sam Spade style—a sutra noir, if you will. It first appeared in the Zen Center of Los Angeles journal The Ten Directions, and a revised version was published about six years back in Inquiring Mind, and more recently in the anthology The Best of Inquiring Mind. We figured the time had come to post it here for members of the Tricycle community.The Big AwakeningBy Andrew Cooper More »
  • The Buddha of the future will have six-pack abs Paid Member

    As Chade-Meng Tan points out in his lastest blog post, enlightenment can look good. At least, that's what this first century Gandharan representation of Maitreya, the future Buddha, seems to indicate. Look at those abs! Meng writes: More »
  • Dharma Combat: Roshi vs. Rinpoche Paid Member

    Sometime in the early 1970s, two Buddhist masters met in Cambridge, Massachusetts. One of them, Kalu Rinpoche, was a renowned Tibetan meditation master who had spent many years in solitary retreat in the remote mountain caves of Tibet. The other was Seung Sahn, a Korean Zen master who had recently come to the United States and was supporting himself by working in a Providence, Rhode Island, Laundromat, slowly planting the seeds of Zen in the minds of those coming to wash their clothes. At this now famous meeting of enlightened minds, Seung Sahn held up an orange and, in classic Zen dharma combat fashion, demanded, "What is this?" Kalu Rinpoche just looked at him, wonderingly. Again Master Seung Sahn asked, "What is this?" Finally Rinpoche turned to his translator and asked, "Don't they have oranges in Korea?" More »