Health

  • Chronic pain? There's hope. Paid Member

    I've heard plenty about meeting pain with meditation, and there's a whole book about it—or many, but this latest book is one I may read in preparation for old age. Author Tim Parks, inspired by a A Headache in the Pelvis, a book by two Stanford urologists who recommend meditation, decided to give it a try. And—drum roll—it worked; his chronic pelvic pain was significantly alleviated. According to tomorrow's Irish Times: It took about three months to lower the levels of pain to such an extent they were no longer a problem, he says. More »
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    This is Getting Old by Susan Moon Paid Member

    I'm in the middle of reading Susan Moon's new book This is Getting Old: Zen Thoughts on Aging with Humor and Dignity—and you should be, too! It's the subject of the Tricycle Community Book Club's new discussion. Susan Moon's book is by turns hilarious, thought-provoking, and deeply moving. Aging is about as universal a topic as it gets, no matter how deep our denial is! More »
  • Things to consider as your parents age Paid Member

    Tricycle contributing editor Katy Butler recently interviewed Jeff Bridges for our upcoming August issue, and, as frequent visitors to our site know by now, you can watch Jeff and Bernie Glassman shooting the breeze in our two-part online interview. More »
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    Tomato flowers Paid Member

    I'm growing tomatoes on my balcony. Today I noticed a few auspicious yellow flowers peeking out. More »
  • Meditators have more brains Paid Member

    Psychology Today reports on a study that indicates that meditators have more gray matter where it counts: A study published in NeuroImage presents findings by a group of researchers at UCLA who used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to scan the brains of meditators. The researchers report having found differences between the scans, showing that certain brain areas of the long-term meditator group were larger than those of the non-meditating control group. More »
  • What is Mindful Eating? Paid Member

    Mindful eating is a practice that engages all parts of us—our body, our heart, and our mind—in choosing, preparing, and eating food. It immerses us in the colors, textures, scents, tastes, and even sounds of drinking and eating. It allows us to be curious and even playful as we investigate our responses to food and our inner cues to hunger and satisfaction. Mindful eating is not based on anxiety about the future but directed by the actual choices that are in front of you and by your direct experiences of health while eating and drinking. Mindful eating replaces self-criticism with self-nurturing. It replaces shame with respect for your own inner wisdom. - Jan Chozen Bays, "Mindful Eating" (Summer 2009) Click here to read the complete article. More »