Environment

  • Wendy Johnson reads "The Call of the Abyss" Paid Member

    Listen to Wendy Johnson, Tricycle's longest-running columnist, read her piece about the BP oil spill, "The Call of the Abyss," from the Fall 2010 issue. From the article: More »
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    The Edge of the Wild Paid Member

    Today's Daily Dharma: Buddhist practice is not about forcing ourselves to be natural. It is about being ourselves. When we take the vows of refuge, we are also pledging to find the refuge that exists within our own lives. This taking of refuge is not some kind of evasion or escape, but is the planting of our "selves" deeply in the nature of what surrounds us. We lodge ourselves in the deep waves and in the shallow pools, in the crests and depressions of our lives. Sometimes, even wreckage can make a temporary resting place. A person whose life is in tatters might have nothing much else left to do but relax and look at the pieces of what's left. Maybe this is the reason that so many of us are drawn to the sea and to the wildness of its coasts. The beaches display a confused but somehow soothing amalgam of particles: bits and pieces of once-living organisms, cracked plastic remnants of human creation, tubber wheels, oilcloth, mesh, fishing line. More »
  • Bill McKibben on "The Moral Math of Climate Change" Paid Member

    Last week, Bill McKibben lit a fire up underneath us all by writing in no uncertain terms about climate change. If you didn’t catch it, read it now. If that leaves you wanting more Bill McKibben you can listen to him in “The Moral Math of Climate Change” on Speaking of Faith with Krista Tippett (which is, in an effort to have a “more spacious container” for the show to grow into, changing its name to Krista Tippett on Being). More »
  • The Indian-Chinese Rivalry Paid Member

    China's "assertiveness" in regional disputes, particularly Tibet, is causing disquiet among the member nations of ASEAN (The Association of Southeast Asian Nations). ASEAN is now looking into territorial disputes in the South China Sea: Although Tibet was never mentioned as part of the dispute in the South China Sea, and the Chinese position over its sovereignty is both very clear and undisputed by all attending ASEAN nations and observers, it is obvious that China’s 60 year old assertiveness towards regional disputes has reached a plateau. Buddhism is still a strong influence in many ASEAN member countries and the plight of the Dalai Lama, while not officially recognized or discussed, still causes regional discomfort. Add to that skirmishes with Vietnam in 1979, and still ongoing border disputes over Tibetan territorial claims with India, and China’s position as asserting more regional sovereignty is now starting to be questioned. Neither India nor China is a member of ASEAN, but the two countries are wrestling for influence in southeast and central Asia and are the elephants in the room at ASEAN discussions. More »