Environment

  • A Wild Love for the World: Joanna Macy on Being Paid Member

    Joanna Macy is interviewed by Krista Tippett this week on Being (formerly Speaking of Faith). Macy is a Buddhist scholar, philosopher of ecology, and a translator of Rilke. During the interview they use Rilke’s poetry to frame the conversation about Macy’s work and world paradigm. Listen to “A Wild Love for the World.” Here is the Rilke poem that Macy credits with eliminating the "constrictions that my culture had made around the sacred": I live my life in widening circles that reach out across the world. I may not complete this last one but I give myself to it. I have been circling around God, around the primordial tower. I've been circling for thousands of years and I still don't know: am I a falcon, More »
  • Buddhism and Ecology Paid Member

    Tricycle contributing editor Martine Batchelor, and Kerry Brown, via The Times of India, Dharma, for Buddhists, is the sacred law, morality and the teachings of the Buddha. It is also all things in nature. Cats, dogs, penguins, trees, humans, mosquitoes, sunlight, leaf dew are all dharmas. So at its very essence, Buddhism  can be described as an ecological religion or a religious ecology. More »
  • Green China? It's complicated... Paid Member

    "China provides a free environment for architects. We're not impeded by the complicated regional planning and bureaucratic red tape. Most importantly, China has great craftsmen who can help me visualize my architectural concepts." That's how American architect David Greenberg sees it, whose work for the past 12 years in China has been heavily influenced by his Zen practice. Greenberg was introduced to Zen in Hawaii by a Chinese master, who also suggested he learn the Tao. A recent work of Greenberg's is a treehouse "eco resort," overlooking the South China Sea, at the Nanshan Buddhist Culture Zone, Sanya, Hainan province. Greenberg is no fan of the Western-style buildings springing up across Chinese cities like mushrooms. As he tells xinhuanet.com: More »
  • The Ethics of Farming Animals Paid Member

    The way I see it, there are two ways to think about the ethics of meat eating. One is to look at the suffering of each individual animal that is killed for consumption. The other way is to take a global approach, where one is concerned with negative environmental/human consequences caused by the meat industry. Of course, you don't have to choose one over the other, it just seems worthwhile to make a distinction. With this distinction in mind I'd like to call attention to a recent piece by George Monbiot in The Guardian that argues that much of the human malnutrition connected to the meat industry could be alleviated most effectively by changing the system in which animals are farmed. The author, a longtime proponent of veganism, had some of his assumptions challenged by the book Meat: A Benign Extravagance by Simon Fairlie. From "I was wrong about veganism. More »
  • Gary Snyder Interview (Earth Day 2009) Paid Member

    Here is a short interview with Gary Snyder, conducted by Adam Phillips for Earth Day 2009. Snyder—Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, Zen practitioner, and Beat legend—primarily discusses the environment. A small dose of the wisdom found in the interview: “A trail is only useful to get you to where you’re going to leave the trail.” Listen to Adam Phillips interview Gary Snyder here. For more Snyder, read his most recent Tricycle article, written with Nelson Foster, “The Fog of World War II.” More »