Zen (Chan)

The meditation (dhyana) school originating in China that emphasizes "mind-to-mind transmission"
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    Slow and Sincere Paid Member

    FOR TEN YEARS I LIVED as a nun in Zen temples in Korea. Every year I loved to see some food appear just once to mark a special occasion. For New Year we looked forward to adzuki bean soup with sticky rice balls for breakfast, five-grain rice at lunch, spicy persimmon punch and sweet rice drink for dessert; for the harvest festival we made half-moon rice cakes filled with sweet bean paste. When the summer was very hot we were served cold stringy buckwheat noodles in cold soy milk broth (not my favorite, l must say). More »
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    Houn Jiyu-Kennet Roshi Paid Member

    Roshi Jiyu-Kennett, founder of Shasta Abbey, died on November 6, at the age of seventy-two. In thirty-three years of teaching, she guided hundreds of students, and her books, including The Wild, White Goose (1977, 1978) and Selling Water by the River (1972),* are read widely by Western Zen practitioners. In her last years of life, however, Kennett Roshi increasingly isolated herself from other Zen lineages in the United States and Japan. More »
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    Seventeen Syllable Medicine Paid Member

    Waking up in the long indigo shadow of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, my heart is granite. A beloved dharma sister and deep writing friend of 30 years has been diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and has just entered an intensive treatment program at the Christus St. Vincent Regional Cancer Center of Northern New Mexico. I have come to keep her company for a week. Outside her home, the first honey blonde columbine of summer push into bloom, a glory I am too numb to celebrate. More »
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    The Way of Ryokan Paid Member

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    The Unfamiliar Familiar Paid Member

    "A fresh look and a fresh listen,” said Robert Frost of a good poem. “Read it a hundred times: it will for ever keep its freshness as a metal keeps its fragrance.” A poem may not show us anything new, but what we see, we see afresh, and what we hear, we hear anew. Frost was talking about the poem itself: what it presents, and the way it does it, should strike us unexpectedly.
 The English novelist and scholar David Lodge asked, “What do we mean . . . when we say that a book is ‘original’? Not, usually, that the writer has invented something without precedent, but that she has made us ‘perceive’ what we already, in a conceptual sense, ‘know,’ by deviating from the conventional, habitual ways of representing reality.” It is newness of seeing, rather than newness per se, that counts. More »
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    After the Monastery Paid Member

    Left to right: Bhikshus Heng Yo and Heng Ju in the rain, on their "three steps, one bow" pilgrimage for world peace, which lasted from October 16, 1973 to August 17, 1974. They continued regardless of weather, traveling 1,150 miles from San Francisco up the Pacifc Coast to Marblemount, Washington.  Introduction by Jeanette (Jetti) Testu More »