Wisdom Collection

The best of Tricycle's member-supported content

Search Results: desire

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Skill in Questions Paid Member

    When we read the account of the Buddha’s last night, it’s easy to sense the importance of his final teaching before entering total nibbana: “Now, then, monks, I exhort you: All fabrications are subject to decay. Bring about completion by being heedful.” These words call attention to themselves because they were the last he ever said. That may be why it’s so easy to overlook the importance of what the Buddha did right before saying them. In a gesture extremely gracious—given that he had been walking all day, had fallen severely ill along the way, and now was about to die—he offered one last opportunity for his followers to question him. More »
  • Tricycle Community 17 comments

    The Gift of Gratitude Paid Member

    Even if one should carry about one’s mother on one shoulder and one’s father on the other, and so doing should live a hundred years . . . moreover, if one should set them up as supreme rulers, having absolute rule over the wide earth abounding in the seven treasures—not even by this could one repay one’s parents. And why! Bhikkhus, parents do a lot for their children: they bring them up, provide them with food, introduce them to the world. More »
  • Tricycle Community 7 comments

    Giving Through Relationships Paid Member

    From Chapter 13 of past Tricycle Retreat leader Ezra Bayda’s new book, Beyond Happiness, The Zen Way to True Contentment: We often look to relationships as a source of our personal happiness. Our relationships with our partners, friends, and family can certainly be enjoyable, and they enrich many dimensions of living. However, much of our unhappiness in life also comes from relationships; and strangely, even though relationships play a huge role in our lives, we are often very much in the dark when it comes to knowing why so much unhappiness is associated with them. Nor do we have a clear idea what to do about it. More »
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    Tortoise Steps Paid Member

    Practicing dharma is necessarily a frustrating business. What practitioners, especially beginners, often fail to realize is that frustrations are the signposts of our success. An exasperating lack of concentration, devotion, or inspiration might be just what you need to make the extra effort to tune in to your practice fully. Alternatively, of course, it may topple you in the other direction and stop you practicing altogether—a temptation you must resist at all costs. Always remember, though, that frustration with your spiritual path is often an indication that you are becoming a genuine dharma practitioner. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    No Satisfaction Paid Member

    While we still have our “self ” intact, that’s the one we love best. We won’t find anybody who will love us as much as we do ourselves. Yet, because of our ego delusion, we believe that there must be somebody like that somewhere. In reality we should look at this search in a different way. We shouldn’t try to find somebody who will help us to support our self-delusion but rather someone who will help us to get rid of it. That can be the Buddha and his teachings, because such is the essence of the dhamma. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    37 Practices of the Bodhisattva - verse 8 Paid Member

    Ken McLeod continues his commentary on the 37 Practices of the Bodhisattva with Verse 8. Watch the other videos here. 8 The suffering in the lower realms is really hard to endure. The Sage says it is the result of destructive actions. For that reason, even if your life is at risk, Don’t engage in destructive actions — this is the practice of a bodhisattva. What are your experiences of destructive emotions taking you to the "lower realms"? How long after you experience destructive emotions do you see the consequences? More »