Wisdom Collection

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Search Results: addiction

  • Tricycle Community 20 comments

    Just Shut Up Paid Member

    Robert Campbell Chodo began using amphetamines and alcohol at age 16. He continued using amphetamines until age 24, before moving on to cocaine for the next 10 years. In 1988, Campbell got sober after seeing a psychotherapist and joining Alcoholics Anonymous, where he attended meetings 3 times a week. While Campbell says that “AA unquestionably gave me the tools to make the life changes,” it wasn’t until he began his Zen practice in 1993 that he began to get “really, really sober.” Today Campbell is one of the Executive Directors for New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care, an organization that provides direct care to the sick, dying, and suffering. More »
  • Tricycle Community 10 comments

    Drink And A Man Paid Member

    The following article is part of Tricycle's e-book Tricycle Teachings: Addiction. If you are a Supporting or Sustaining Member, you can download the e-book for free here. Not a Supporting or Sustaining Member? Join here. More »
  • The Path of Recovery Paid Member

    We are headed for a fall as a species, and it seems that all we can do is watch. Some say our imaginations are not big enough to take in the full scope of the catastrophe—the extinction of up to one half of Earth’s plant and animal species by century’s end. Others claim that we can’t help ourselves. We’re sick, addicted to everything from petroleum products to that ubiquitous soporific we call “media.” They’re killing us. Still, we remain stuck to them like glue. Of the two explanations, addiction seems more apt. Our imaginations are better than ever. They tell us that we can invent our way out of this problem, that by digging the hole of human progress just a little deeper, somehow we will come out on top. More »
  • The Care of Earth Paid Member

    Ask ten people on the street if they believe in God, and—depending on where you live—you could get ten different answers. Ask ten Buddhists if they believe in Amida Buddha, and the responses will likewise vary: “He’s a fairy tale.” “He’s a metaphor.” “I plan to be born in his Pure Land when I die.”But what if you ask ten people if they believe in Earth?A few ecology-minded souls might get what you were up to, probably the younger ones. The rest wouldn’t have a clue. A typical answer might go something like this: “Earth is what we stand on. Earth is where we live. It doesn’t matter whether we believe in Earth or not. Earth is simply real.” More »
  • Tricycle Community 41 comments

    Restored to Sanity Paid Member

    What will it take to restore us to ecological sanity? If what we are suffering from in this hot, flat, crowded 21st century is an Earth-destroying addiction (and the sheer scale of our denial suggests that it is), then that is the only question worth asking. We might not know the answer right away, but at least we know what it isn’t. The answer isn’t us. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Making Amends Paid Member

    Made a list of all those we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all. How far were we to go in making our amends to those we had harmed? Should we move to a yurt in the woods? reduce our carbon footprint? become an advocate for third world countries whose environments had been decimated by our greed for cheap disposable products? And what was the purpose of such an exercise? Was it to assuage our guilt, or were we actually expected to right our ecological wrongs? More »