Train Your Mind: The Ejection of Consciousness

The 59 Lojong slogans with commentary by Acharya Judy Lief

Judy Lief

The Mind-Training Slogans, Slogan #18

Acharya Judy            LiefEach Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha's 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice.

Atisha (980-1052 CE) was an Indian adept who brought to Tibet a systematized approach to bodhicitta (the desire to awaken for the sake of all sentient beings) and loving-kindness, through working with these slogans. Judy edited Chogyam Trungpa's Training the Mind (Shambhala, 1993), which contains Trungpa Rinpoche's commentaries on the lojong ("mind-training") teachings.

Each entry includes a practice.

Read all the lojong slogans here.


18. The mahayana instruction for ejection of consciousness at death
Is the five strengths: how you conduct yourself is important.

The previous slogan was about how to live, and this slogan is about how to die. It may seem that living and dying are two very different things, but they are completely interconnected. We learn how to live by learning how to die and we learn how to die by learning how to live. Each informs the other.

According to this slogan “how you conduct yourself is important.” This is actually quite provocative. We usually divide our experience, viewing some things we do as a big deal and very important and viewing other things as trivial or insignificant. It is easy to think of dying as an end to our ability to do anything of significance and living as what really matters and where we get things done. But the idea here is that how we conduct ourselves in every single action matters and is important in and of itself.

As in the precious slogan, the point is that acting properly takes strength and exertion. To start with, you have to set your mind in the right direction. If you are just drifting along in a haze, you will easily be thrown off course. It takes real determination to maintain a sane and compassionate approach even in the face of death. When we are threatened, it is so easy to lose both our sanity and our compassion.

Determination goes a long way, and it gains even more strength to the degree that you develop an ongoing habit of mindfulness. By practice, by repetition, mindfulness becomes familiar territory for you. It is like the old joke: How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, practice, practice. Through practice you begin to uncover obstacles that may arise in facing death, such as fear and attachment, so you have a way of dealing with them. And when you really look into such obstacles, you see that they can all be traced back to the fixed belief in a solid separate ego, which seems to be being threatened. Examining even further, you realize that there is no such thing as a solid separate ego—it has no true existence, so nothing, in fact, dies.

Today’s practice

Spend some time contemplating the things that make you afraid, and how you react. Contemplate times you are in pain, and how you deal with it. Notice whatever causes you to lose your mindfulness. Determine to hold the perspective of mindfulness and compassion even in the midst of fear, pain, or dying.

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Philip Ryan's picture

Dear Poet,

There are different English translations for this slogan. Ken McCleod's is "The mahayana instructions for how to die are the five forces. How you act is important."  Chögaym Trungpa Rinpoche and others translate it as "The mahayana instruction for ejection of consciousness at death is the five strengths: how you conduct yourself is important."  What is being referred to by "the ejection of consciousness" is the view that at the moment of death one's consciousness separates from the physical body.  Along with the five strengths, it is taught that the best way to effect a proper ejection of consciousness is by resting the mind in ultimate bodhichitta as you approach death and at the moment of dying. The slogans that focus on ultimate bodhchitta are slogans 2-6.

Thanks for your curiosity,

Judy

poet748's picture

I've never heard of the "Mahayana instruction for ejection of consciousness at death."  What is being referred to here?