Pure Land (Shin)

Mahayana school whose central figure is Amitabha, Buddha of the Infinite Light
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    Come Together Paid Member

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    The Buddha of Infinite Light and Life Paid Member

    Taitetsu Unno, professor emeritus of religious studies at Smith College, is one of the major figures in post–World War II American Jodo Shinshu Buddhism. Besides his numerous scholarly publications on Buddhism, his books River of Fire, River of Water: An Introduction to the Pure Land Tradition of Shin Buddhism (Doubleday, 1998) and Shin Buddhism: Bits of Rubble Turn into Gold (Doubleday, 2002) have helped many people to discover the riches of this major Buddhist tradition. More »
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    Number One Fool Paid Member

    BUDDHISM IS A PATH of supreme optimism, for one of its basic tenets is that no human life or experience is to be wasted or forgotten, but all should be transformed into a source of wisdom and compassionate living. This is the connotation of the classical statement that sums up the goal of Buddhist life: "Transform delusion into enlightenment." On the everyday level of experience, Shin Buddhists speak of this transformation as "bits of rubble turn into gold." More »
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    Born Again Buddhist Paid Member

    ONE MORNING NOT LONG AGO, I was born again. Though unexpected, this was never outside the realm of possibility. According to the teachings of Pure Land Buddhism, all who call Namu Amida Butsu, Amida Buddha’s name, may be reborn in the “Land of Utmost Bliss,” provided they truly believe that he will save them. That, of course, had been the problem. Try as I might to finesse my way into the Pure Land, it didn’t matter as long as I didn’t believe. More »
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    Essential and Pure Paid Member

    FOR MORE THAN a hundred years, American Pure Land Buddhists have been publishing sutra commentaries, dharma talks, and personal reflections. Indeed, those affiliated with Jodo Shinshu—literally “the true school of the Pure Land,” often called Shin Buddhism—have produced far more Buddhist works in America than any other sect. Why, then, are this venerable Buddhist publishing tradition and the many small presses that support it relatively unknown outside Pure Land circles? Most Tricycle readers are probably familiar with Wisdom Publications and Shambhala Publications, but how many have heard of Buddhist Study Center Press or the Nembutsu Press? More »
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    A Successful Encounter Paid Member

    At the turn of this century, the only English-language Buddhist magazine published on the West Coast was The Light of Dharma (1901-07). The magazine was produced under the auspices of the Japanese Pure Land (Jodo Shin) Buddhist Mission temple in San Francisco, which was established in 1899 by priests sent from the Nishi-Honganji headquarters in Kyoto, Japan. Unlike the temple's monthly Japanese publication, Beikoku Bukkyo (Buddhism in America), which was read primarily by newly arrived Japanese immigrants, The Light of Dharma had both a wider readership and a greater range of contributors. More »