July 19, 2011

Don't worry if you don't understand stuff

July 19, 2011

Why is Buddhism so Damned Expensive?

Monty McKeever

Do Not Fear Failure

Do Not Fear Failure

Do not fear failure. Whatever happened in the past is past; do not worry about it happening again. Before you meet with success, failure is natural and necessary.

-Master Sheng-Yen

pub_date: 
07/27/2011
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Develop Fundamental Trust

Develop Fundamental Trust

In order to communicate very openly with the world, you need to develop fundamental trust. This kind of trust is not trusting “in” something, but simply trusting. It is very much like your breath. You do not consciously hold on to your breath, or trust in your breath, yet breathing is your very nature. In the same way, to be trusting is your very nature. To be trusting means you are fundamentally free from doubt about your goodness and about the goodness of others.

-Dr. Jeremy Hayward

Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo's Tricycle Retreat on the Eight Worldly Concerns is in session!

pub_date: 
07/26/2011
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The Mysteries of the Heart

The Mysteries of the Heart

Buddhism is nothing other than a set of practices to open up the mysteries of the human heart and the deepest realities of our human experience as those exist, uniquely in us, right at this moment. And the human heart is not personal: the more we fathom our own hearts, the more we find there the being of others and, beyond that, the very heart of the world itself.

-Reginald Ray

Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo's Tricycle Retreat on the Eight Worldly Concerns is in session!

pub_date: 
07/25/2011
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Observe the Clouds

Observe the Clouds

Traditionally, clouds are symbolic of things indeterminate. Composed of air and water, their essential nature can be attributed to neither element but arises in an obscuring of the two, a betwixt-and-between phenomenon, not unlike human beings, those nebulous creatures who themselves seem caught between realms, floating along between the shimmering horizons of birth and death, here and there, earth and heaven. Buddhist psychology refers to the aggregate of what we call personality as “the five clouds of entanglement.”

-John P. O’Grady

Special for July: Tricycle Community Members can purchase Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo' new book, Into the Heart of Life, at 20% off!

pub_date: 
07/24/2011
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Daily Life As Teacher

Daily Life As Teacher

Being self-aware in the midst of our daily lives provides us with so much material with which to notice the reality of our imperfect selves but, at the same time, to be brought to realize how we are embraced by Ultimate Wisdom and Compassion at all times. There’s no practice a person can specifically do to attain perfect awakening, whether it’s meditation or trying to follow precepts. Of course these are good practices, but we can never totally free ourselves of our blind passions. If we believe we can do it this way, the calculation is a reflection of our ego-selves. Instead, we can be mindful of the dharma as we go about our lives.

-Reverend Patricia Kanaya Usuki

Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo's Tricycle Retreat on the Eight Worldly Concerns is in session!

pub_date: 
07/23/2011
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A Foundation for Lay Practice

A Foundation for Lay Practice

In Theravada, all the lay practitioners start with dana [perfection of giving] and then sila [ethical precepts], and the next step, which is crucial, is bhavana—meditation. These are all interrelated. If you want to be an engaged Buddhist, if you only practice dana, you become a goody-goody. You must go further. With sila, the emphasis is how not to exploit yourself and how not to exploit others....Sila and dana work together. With bhavana—whatever you do, be mindful. Be engaged. Without mindfulness, you can become very angry, greedy, very deluded. You may feel, "Oh, I'm a Buddhist now, I can do all these good things." That's very egoistic. Ultimately, a Buddhist should work toward selflessness.

-Sulak Sivaraksa

Special for July: Tricycle Community Members can purchase Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo' new book, Into the Heart of Life, at 20% off!

pub_date: 
07/22/2011
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Expect the Unexpected

Expect the Unexpected

We all enter the spiritual path as ego-based beings, and as such we have ego-based hopes and fears. Practice is virtually never what we expect. We feel like we’ve got it all wrong, thinking, “The more I meditate, the worse I become.” My teacher, Gendun Rinpoche, always responded to this by saying, “When you see your own shortcomings, it’s the dawn of qualities. If you only see your qualities, there’s a problem.”

-Lama Tsony

Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo's Tricycle Retreat on the Eight Worldly Concerns is in session!

pub_date: 
07/21/2011
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The Universal Telescope

The Universal Telescope

It is very important to see your life not only from the narrow view of your egoistic telescope but also from the broad view of the universal telescope called egolessness. This is why we have to practice. Right in the middle of the stream of time, we have to open our eyes there and see the total picture of time. Through spiritual practice we can go beyond our egoistic point of view. We can touch the core of time, see the whole world in a moment, and understand time in deep relationship with all beings.

-Dainin Katagiri

Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo's Tricycle Retreat on the Eight Worldly Concerns is in session!

pub_date: 
07/20/2011
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