Mindfulness (sati)

The meditation practice of maintaining awareness of one's body and consciousness
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    Begin with the Breath Paid Member

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    On the Contagious Power of Presence Paid Member

    Being present is based on the cultivation of mindfulness in whatever we do. Through mindfulness, we develop greater composure and a heightened sensitivity to nonverbal communication. Then, to the extent that we ourselves are present, we can radiate that same quality outward to the people around us. It is hard to be generous, disciplined, or patient if we are not fully present. If we are present and attentive, and our mind is flexible, we are more receptive to the environment around us. When we are working with the dying, this ability to pick up on the environment is invaluable. The more present we are, the more we can tune in to what is happening. At the same time, that quality of presence is contagious. The dying person picks up on it. The people around him pick up on it. Presence is a powerful force. It settles the environment so that people can begin to relax. More »
  • Guided Meditation: Sustain unwavering mindfulness of all appearances Paid Member

    Alan Wallace's Minding Closely is this month's selection at the Tricycle Book Club. In partnership with Snow Lion Publications, all Tricycle Community Members can get Minding Closely at a 20% discount with free shipping in the US*, plus free e-book for instant download. Get the book now. From the book: More »
  • Practical Matters: How to benefit most from mindfulness practice Paid Member

    We're reading B. Alan Wallace's new book, Minding Closely: The Four Applications of Mindfulness, at the Tricycle Book Club. Join us to discuss both the theory and practice of mindfulness. From Minding Closely: More »
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    Introduction to Focusing Paid Member

    Most people find it easier to learn Focusing through individual instruction than through simply reading about it. The actual process of Focusing, experienced from the inside, is fluid and open, allowing great room for individual differences and ways of working. Yet to introduce the concepts and flavor of the technique, some structure can be useful for those who have not found a certified trainer. Although these steps may provide a window into Focusing, it is important to remember that they are not the only six steps. Focusing has no rigid, fixed agenda for the inner world; many Focusing sessions bear little resemblance to the mechanical process that we define here. Still, every Focusing trainer is deeply familiar with the six steps listed below, and uses them as needed throughout a Focusing session. And many people have had success getting in touch with the heart of the process just by following these simple instructions. More »