Mindfulness (sati)

The meditation practice of maintaining awareness of one's body and consciousness
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    From the Canon: The Visible Teaching Paid Member

    Once a wandering ascetic, Moliya Sivaka, addressed the Blessed One as follows:“It is said, venerable sir, ‘The dhamma is directly visible.’ In what way, venerable sir, is the dhamma directly visible, immediate, inviting one to come and see, worthy of application, to be personally experienced by the wise?”“Well, Sivaka, I shall in return question you about this. You may answer as you see fit.“What do you think, Sivaka: when there is greed in you, will you know, ‘There is greed in me’? And when there is no greed in you, will you know, ‘There is no greed in me’?” — “Yes, venerable sir, I shall know.”“If you thus know of the greed present in you that it is there; and when greed is absent that it is absent—that is a way the dhamma is directly visible. More »
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    Water the Flowers, Not the Weeds Paid Member

    If you’re out watering your flower garden by hand, you naturally concentrate the flow of water to benefit your beautiful flowers. If there’s an area of weeds, you don’t waste water there. As best you can, you avoid watering the weeds.It’s the same with your consciousness. You can learn to selectively water the positive seeds and flowers in you by attending to them. There are enough weeds. You don’t have to encourage them. More »
  • From "Teachings on Mindfulness" Paid Member

    And how, monks, does a monk abide contemplating the body as body? Here a monk, having gone into the forest, or to the root of a tree, or to an empty place, sits down cross-legged, holding his body erect, having established mindfulness before him. Mindfully he breathes in, mindfully he breathes out. Breathing in a long breath, he knows that he breathes in a long breath, and breathing out a long breath, he knows that he breathes out a long breath. Breathing in a short breath, he knows that he breathes in a short breath, and breathing out a short breath, he knows that he breathes out a short breath. More »
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    Commit to Sit: Week 4, Thoughts Paid Member

    WEEK FOUR: ThoughtsYou’ve made it to the final week. Acknowledge your hard work and recognize the joy that comes from following through on a commitment. In this final week we will further develop the skills we have worked on over the last twenty-one days and will expand our realm of focus to include thoughts. Working with Thoughts For the purpose of meditation, nothing is particularly worth thinking about: not our childhood, not our relationships, not the great novel we always wanted to write. This does not mean that thoughts will not come. In fact, they may come with tremendous frequency. We do not need to fight with them or struggle against them or judge them. Rather, we can simply choose not to follow the thoughts once they have arisen. The quicker we notice that we are thinking, the quicker we can see thought’s empty nature. More »
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    At Home In Our Bodies Paid Member

    Can Buddhist practice liberate us from the prison of physical pain? How can meditation help when medicine falls short? Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph. D., professor emeritus of medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, speaks to these questions as a longtime practitioner of Buddhist meditation and hatha yoga, and as a pioneer in the use of mindfulness to treat chronic pain and illness. More than 13,000 people have visited the world-renowned Stress Reduction Clinic that Kabat-Zinn established in 1979 at the UMass Medical Center, and the eight-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program—described in Kabat-Zinn's bestseller Full Catastrophe Living—is now also offered at some two hundred other medical facilities worldwide. More »