Lovingkindness (metta)

Maitri or metta meditation, the cultivation of lovingkindness toward all beings
  • Tricycle Community 10 comments

    If There Is No Self, Who Is Born, Who Dies, Who Meditates? Paid Member

    ONE OF THE MOST PUZZLING aspects of the Buddha's teachings is the idea of no self. If there's no self, who gets angry, who falls in love, who makes effort, who has memories or gets reborn? What does it mean to say there is no self? Sometimes people are afraid of this idea, imagining themselves suddenly disappearing in a cloud of smoke, like a magician's trick. More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    The Four Immeasurables Paid Member

    Buddhism teaches that there is no such thing as the self as we think we know it: a separate, bounded self, strictly cordoned off from what is “other.” When we are freed from the reactive patterns sprung from the boundaries we live by—good and bad; love and hate—we are not the self we were before. And when the boundaries themselves dissolve, self as we understand it disappears. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    A Few Simple Lines Paid Member

    To make my sitting practice a daily priority.To spend less time being social with strangers, online.To think twice before acting on the heart’s closings.To not expect too much, and be grateful for what is.To make room for the unavoidable unpleasantness.To not cling to pleasant things, people, or moments.To have compassion for my imperfections, and those of others.To uproot the hindrances, especially fear and anger.To view each social interaction as an opportunity to learn.To play catch with thoughts and chase away the impure ones.To move more slowly and more deliberately in the world.To be more with nature, and people, and less in my head.To rest in the breath often throughout the days.To walk each step, thankful for the earth beneath.To practice lovingkindness often, and forgive myself when I forget . . . More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    May I Be Happy Paid Member

    Walking along the Rhine River during my lunch break from teaching yoga in Basel, Switzerland, I felt mellow and full of gratitude to have such a wonderful job opportunity. Then my phone started to vibrate. Instantly my mood shifted, and a powerful sense of urgency took hold of me. It was like a Rube Goldberg chain reaction—I was balancing a cappuccino in one hand, fighting an uncooperative purse zipper with the other, trying to keep my glasses on my nose, and worrying that someone was calling from my mother’s nursing home. More »
  • Tricycle Community 22 comments

    The Buddha's Smile Paid Member

    The most difficult Buddhist idea to explain, I’ve found, is not interdependent arising or nonself, challenging though these are, but equanimity. How is it that one can neither like nor not like something without being emotionally detached or indifferent? Our sense of identity is so bound up with our desires that to many people the thought of being without preferences for one thing or another is tantamount to being stripped of the very quality that makes us human. Nonattachment is just so dry. Give me the pot-bellied laughing Buddha any day (who, of course, is not a Buddha at all but a Chinese folk deity), rather than the austere figure presiding over our meditation halls with barely a hint of a smile on his face. More »
  • Tricycle Community 7 comments

    A Change of Heart Paid Member

    For many years we’ve heard the same slogan called out again and again, a cry for reconciliation between Israel and Palestine: “Peace in the Middle East!” In October, this call will be heard once again, but this time it will not be shouted out or scrawled on posters. It will be cried out another way: by the silent presence of peace walkers. More »