Lovingkindness (metta)

Maitri or metta meditation, the cultivation of lovingkindness toward all beings
  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Cultivating Compassion Paid Member

    Metta meditation is a practice of cultivating understanding, love, and compassion by looking deeply, first for ourselves and then for others. Once we love and take care of ourselves, we can be much more helpful to others. Metta meditation can be practiced in part or in full. Just saying one line of the metta meditation will already bring more compassion and healing into the world. To love is, first of all, to accept ourselves as we actually are. That is why in this love meditation, “Know thyself” is the first practice of love. When we practice this, we see the conditions that have caused us to be the way we are. This makes it easy for us to accept ourselves, including our suffering and our happiness at the same time. More »
  • Bringing It All Back Home Paid Member

    Sometimes people ask me if there isn’t a conflict between the Mahayana instruction to see all beings as close relatives, worthy of our affection and compassion, and Buddhist teachings on nonattachment. Perhaps they are thinking of Jetsun Milarepa’s words: When you look at your child Firstly he is a soft-spoken young god.Then he is a distant-hearted neighbour.Finally he is an enemy and creditor.So I let go of children. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    If There Is No Self, Who Is Born, Who Dies, Who Meditates? Paid Member

    ONE OF THE MOST PUZZLING aspects of the Buddha's teachings is the idea of no self. If there's no self, who gets angry, who falls in love, who makes effort, who has memories or gets reborn? What does it mean to say there is no self? Sometimes people are afraid of this idea, imagining themselves suddenly disappearing in a cloud of smoke, like a magician's trick. More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    The Four Immeasurables Paid Member

    Buddhism teaches that there is no such thing as the self as we think we know it: a separate, bounded self, strictly cordoned off from what is “other.” When we are freed from the reactive patterns sprung from the boundaries we live by—good and bad; love and hate—we are not the self we were before. And when the boundaries themselves dissolve, self as we understand it disappears. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    A Few Simple Lines Paid Member

    To make my sitting practice a daily priority.To spend less time being social with strangers, online.To think twice before acting on the heart’s closings.To not expect too much, and be grateful for what is.To make room for the unavoidable unpleasantness.To not cling to pleasant things, people, or moments.To have compassion for my imperfections, and those of others.To uproot the hindrances, especially fear and anger.To view each social interaction as an opportunity to learn.To play catch with thoughts and chase away the impure ones.To move more slowly and more deliberately in the world.To be more with nature, and people, and less in my head.To rest in the breath often throughout the days.To walk each step, thankful for the earth beneath.To practice lovingkindness often, and forgive myself when I forget . . . More »