Insight (vipassana)

Unique to Buddhism, the meditation practice of self-observation that reveals the true nature of reality
  • Tricycle Community 14 comments

    The Six Disguises of Mind Paid Member

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Death Awareness Paid Member

    On each branch of the trees in my gardenHang clusters of fruit, swelling and ripe. In the end, not one piece will remain. My mind turns to thoughts of my death.—Seventh Dalai Lama Many meditations focus on something associated with beauty or joy or peace. Perhaps some of you may puzzle over why a contemplation would focus on death. Actually, in the teachings of the Buddha, it's a very important practice. It's part of the general importance given to impermanence, change—and death is a dramatic case of that. Reflections on anicca—that everything that arises passes away—is central to wisdom practice. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Dharma 101 Paid Member

    Dharma 101 is a sampling of the questions that commonly arise in the course of practice. In some cases, Buddhist teachers themselves identified the questions they most frequently hear from students. To those, we brought experiences from workshops, retreats, and classes—and asked some questions of our own. While the inquiries may sound familiar to many dharma practitioners, the responses may not. This may point to a difference in view or understanding between teachers. Or it may indicate a difference in tradition. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The First Teachings Paid Member

    THE FIRST TIME I heard my Buddhist teachers explain the Four Noble Truths—beginning  with "life is dukkha" (unsatisfying, painful by its very nature, unreliable even when it is pleasant because it is always  changing)—I thought, "They're telling the truth. These people are talking about exactly what I'm worried about. They know what the real problem is. And they promise a solution." More »
  • Tricycle Community 54 comments

    Unmasking the Self Paid Member

    Awareness cannot be taught, and when it is present it has no context. All contexts are created by thought and are therefore corruptible by thought. Awareness simply throws light on what is, without any separation whatsoever. Awareness, insight, enlightenment, wholeness—whatever words one may pick to label what cannot be caught in words—is not the effect of a cause. Activity does not destroy it and sitting does not create it. It isn’t a product of anything—no technique, method, environment, tradition, posture, activity, or nonactivity can create it. It is there, uncreated, freely functioning in wisdom and love, when self-centered conditioning is clearly revealed in all its grossness and subtleness and defused in the light of understanding. More »