Contemplation

The meditation practice of examining all aspects of an object
  • Tricycle Community 27 comments

    Little "Aha!"s Paid Member

    Ram Dass says of his latest book, One-Liners, "It's a kind of spiritual brandy, a distillation of the lectures I've given over the course of the past decade or so. At my lectures, I like to say that my name, Ram Dass, means 'servant of God,' but that 'R-A-M' is also an acronym for 'Rent-a-Mouth': that is, my listeners and my readers rent my mouth to tell us what all of us already know. What I say comes not from me, but from the consciousness common to all of us. And the quotes in this book are the little 'aha!'" More »
  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Evaluate Your Meditation Paid Member

    After a person has been meditating for some time, it’s important that he or she evaluate how the practice is developing. Is it working? Does it need adjustment? Is it the right practice to be doing? Can it be improved? Some of this evaluation can be done on one’s own, some with a teacher or with friends.Taking a step back to assess our meditation shouldn’t be seen as a difficult task. We are evaluators by nature. We evaluate all the time, even if subconsciously. We decide what clothes to wear after considering a number of factors, not least of all the weather. An activity as simple as going for a walk requires a variety of considerations: How far will I walk? Does the walk require preparation? Do I need to pace myself if it is a long walk? What is the best route? Which are the best shoes? More »
  • Tricycle Community 22 comments

    Emptiness: All or Nothing Paid Member

    The idea of sunyata (Pali sunnata) or emptiness has been variously understood—and misunderstood—for centuries. Joan Konner's recent book, "You Don't Have to Be Buddhist to Know Nothing," gathers together the thoughts of philosophers, poets, and pundits, Buddhist and non-Buddhist, on nothing, emptiness, sunyata. Some examples: "The nothing is the force whereby the something can be manifested." - Alan Watts "Poetry makes nothing happen." - W.H. Auden "Nothing is exciting, nothing is sexy, nothing is not embarrassing." - Andy Warhol More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Time & Again Paid Member

    An ancient buddha said:For the time being stand on top of the highest peak.For the time being proceed along the bottom of the deepest ocean.For the time being three heads and eight arms.For the time being an eight- or sixteen-foot body.For the time being a staff or whisk.For the time being a pillar or lantern.For the time being the sons of Zhang and Li.For the time being the earth and sky.–Eihei Dogen (The Time-Being, translated by Kazuaki Tanahashi and Dan Welch) More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    The Balancing Buddha Paid Member

    THE MIDDLE WAY is achieved when one reaches that point of cosmic balance between austerity and the creature comforts of the world. The ascetics who were with the Buddha were critical of him because he was no longer living an austere lifestyle. They considered his life too “cushy.” He was eating beautiful food and wearing a fine robe, while they existed on a few grains of rice and slept uncovered on a bed of nails.The ascetics asked the Buddha, “What kind of teacher and yogi are you? You are soft, weak, indulgent.” More »
  • Tricycle Community 17 comments

    What to Expect When You’re Reflecting Paid Member

    I CAN'T count how many would-be meditators have come to me in despair and admitted that they just don't get it. Meditation is beyond them, they say. Their minds are not suitable receptacles. As a teacher I try to maintain a certain distance, but whenever this happens I want to jump up and hug these people—not out of consolation but from the pride of seeing them take their first baby steps, even if they don't know it. It's one of the great rewards of teaching to know they're turning tentatively inward. It makes all my efforts worthwhile. More »