Compassion

The cultivation of karuna, or compassion, which tempers wisdom's cool discernment
  • Bringing It All Back Home Paid Member

    Sometimes people ask me if there isn’t a conflict between the Mahayana instruction to see all beings as close relatives, worthy of our affection and compassion, and Buddhist teachings on nonattachment. Perhaps they are thinking of Jetsun Milarepa’s words: When you look at your child Firstly he is a soft-spoken young god.Then he is a distant-hearted neighbour.Finally he is an enemy and creditor.So I let go of children. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Breaking the Habit of Selfishness Paid Member

    The short poem “Eight Verses for Training the Mind” is a famous example of a special Tibetan genre called mind training (lojong). The word mind here refers to both the conventional and ultimate minds of enlightenment—the altruistic intention to become enlightened as well as the direct realization of emptiness by someone endowed with this altruistic intention. Mind training in its broadest sense means developing altruism and realization of the nature of all phenomena, topics relevant for any practitioner. Only the final two lines of the eighth verse explicitly address cultivation of the ultimate mind of enlightenment, but the two practices interact synergistically to enhance each other and help make each other possible; thus, as daily reflection and meditation, the two work hand in hand. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The Benevolence of the True Teachers Paid Member

    Such is the benevolence of Amida’s great compassion,That we must strive to return it, even to the breaking of our bodies; Such is the benevolence of the masters and true teachers,That we must endeavor to repay it, even to our bones becoming dust.Hymns of the Dharma-Ages, 59. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The Good Heart: A Buddhist Perspective On The Teachings Of Jesus Paid Member

    The Good Heart: A Buddhist Perspective on the Teachings of JesusHis Holiness the Dalai Lama Wisdom Publications: Boston, 1996.207 pp., $24.00 (hardcover). More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Avalokiteshvara Paid Member

    Avalokiteshvara is recognized throughout the Mahayana Buddhist world as the bodhisattva of compassion. Having made the vow not to enter nirvana until all beings have attained enlightment, this bodhisattva remains in samsara in order to answer the cries of suffering—hence the name Avalokiteshvara, "Perceiver of the World's Sounds." In Tibet, Avalokiteshvara's principal manifestation is Chenrezi, the bodhisattva invoked by reciting the mantra Om Mani Padme Hum. In China, the earliest paintings depict Avalokiteshvara as male, but by the seventh century C.E. he had assumed the willowy, feminine form of Kuan yin. This Chinese form was adopted in Japan, where she is called Kannon of Kanzeon, and is generally depicted as female or androgynous in form. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Where is Buddha? Paid Member

    IN MY OFFICE THERE IS A SCROLL with Japanese calligraphy and a painting of Zen master Bodhidharma. Bodhidharma is a fat, grumpy-looking man with bushy eyebrows. He looks as if he has indigestion.  The calligraphy reads, "Pointing directly at your own heart, you find Buddha. " More »