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  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Being Intimate with Demons Paid Member

    At Tassajara, the Soto Zen monastery inland from Big Sur, where I lived for three years in the mid-seventies, a stone Buddha of great beauty and concentration sits on an altar. From his lotus throne he radiates both serenity and acceptance, the traditional half-smile on his face greeting whatever is brought into the room. In many ways, I found such a reminder of one’s own Buddha-nature quite helpful. Without such equanimity, how could one sit without moving amid the many hours of thoughts, feelings, memories, physical pain, or even the joys, that are an inevitable part of Zen practice? More »
  • Exile Spirit Paid Member

    DARKNESS CLIMBS THE WILD SAGEBRUSH SLOPES around the Metta Forest Monastery northeast of San Diego. Coyotes bark. In a leveled clearing, light spills out from a simple wooden shrine. Inside all is quiet except for a single voice—pausing . . . going on, pausing . . . going on again. In clear and certain tones, the voice of Thanissaro Bhikkhu leads a guided meditation for a handful of people sitting Thai-style on their ankles under the gaze of a huge golden Buddha. There are three young men from the outskirts of Los Angeles, a lone schoolteacher from Alaska, a Thai family, and several women and men. More »
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    Meditation In Action Paid Member

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    Rocky Flats Paid Member

    THE WORD "CHARNEL" derives from "carnal"—in or of the flesh. A charnel ground is a place where fleshly bodies are discarded after death, where vultures, jackals, ravens descend to feed upon the juicy raw meat, leaving bloodied severed limbs and bones strewn about. Heaps of bones pile up. The charnel ground is a cemetery, a highly visible boneyard. It is the ritual spot where tantric adepts perform the shamanic chod, or "cutting" practice (a meditation on one's own dismembered body) that initiates the practitioner into the mysteries of death and birth. From a psychological point of view, the charnel ground is that state of mind in which birth and death occur simultaneously. It is a mental process of hope and desperation. You can't ignore it. More »
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    Time Paid Member

    Between the Buddhist calendar, which dates the coming year at approximately 2543, and Buddhist teachings that speak of "beginningless time" in which the whole of the past and future exist only in the present moment, the millennium blitz seems to have drawn us into its illusory phenomenon of a linear, Western, short-term sense of time, as encapsulated as a cuckoo clock. Yet we in the West are not without our own sense of infinite time,� More »
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    No Place to Hide Paid Member

                                         In people's idealized notions of a monk or a nun, one assumption is very accurate: that it simplifies your life so that you can put all your energy into waking up. Of course, not only monks and nuns are committed to waking up. But for many people, regular life is too distracting—which is to say, they are not at a place where they feel they can follow a path, because their ordinary life keeps overwhelming them or dragging them into passion, aggression, and ignorance. More »