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  • Tricycle Community 7 comments

    Domains of Consciousness Paid Member

    Tricycle: Is there a Buddhist point of view on psychedelics? Kornfield: No. Psychedelics are found rarely, if at all, in the Buddhist tradition, and generally would be lumped together in the precepts under “intoxicants.” In Zen, Vajrayana, and the Theravada traditions, there is very little mention of them and there is no traditional point of view about their use. It is important to understand that. What points of view we have come from the understanding of Buddhist masters and teachers based on contemporary experience. More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    On the Front Lines Paid Member

    Tricycle: Do you find yourself having to address the issue of psychedelic use in your teaching? More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Liberty and LSD Paid Member

    Over the last 25 years, I’ve watched a lot of Deadheads, Buddhists, and other free-thinkers do acid. I’ve taken it myself. I still do occasionally, in a ritual sort of way. On the basis of their experience and my own, I know that the public terror of LSD is based more on media-propagated superstition than familiarity with its effects on the real world. I know this, and, like most others who know it, I have kept quiet about it. Shortly after the Bill of Rights was drafted, the English philosopher John Stuart Mill said, “Liberty resides in the rights of that person whose views you find most odious.” The Buddha was wise to point out that people must be free to work out for themselves what is true from actual experience and express it without censure. I will go further and say that liberty resides in its exercise. It is preserved in the actual spouting of those odious views. It is maintained, and always has been, by brave and lonely cranks. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    To the Source Paid Member

    When my mother took LSD in 1975, under the amicable supervision of Stanislav Grof and Joan Halifax, she had no idea I was growing inside her. Throughout the trip, she commented on the movement in her belly, how it pulsed and distended. That was me. I was smaller than a grape seed, yet I was clearly huge. My mother and I achieved a psychic union that was more vast, more seamless than even our circumstance. Perhaps I remember expanding; beyond my cells, their race of microscopic bloom; beyond the amniotic womb—yet corded to the flesh creating me. My early introduction to psychedelics, two weeks after conception, is not remarkable. My parents, a Spanish teacher and a sculptor/businessman, were involved in Esalen during the early seventies and lived for a period in a San Francisco ashram. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Entheogens: A Brief History of Their Spiritual Use Paid Member

    To many people, the words psychedelic and spiritual are dissonant on first hearing. Yet the use of psychoactive sacraments in shamanic and religious practices is found throughout history. The word entheogen, used to describe certain plants and chemicals when used for spiritual purposes, emphasizes this long-established relationship. Following is a survey of the most historically prominent and widely used entheogens. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    No Second Guessing Paid Member

    Stephen Levine has been working with the terminally ill and the grieving for nearly two decades. His books include A Gradual Awakening, Who Dies?, Healing into Life and Death, and, most recently, Guided Meditations, Explorations and Healings (all published by Doubleday, Anchor Books). He and his wife Ondrea lead workshops and meditations for the dying and their families, and are also the co-directors of the Hanuman Foundation Dying Project. This interview was conducted for Tricycle by Managing Editor Carole Tonkinson. Tricycle: Buddhist teachers say that if one commits suicide, it will create negative circumstances for one's next life. How do you reconcile this with euthanasia? More »