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    Passing It On Paid Member

    A cookie works for a few minutes. An animated sponge and a couple of well-meaning monsters pass the time until the final credits bring a howl of despair. The stuffed pig from FAO Schwarz provides some comfort, though a fruitless search for a duplicate since Schwarz went bankrupt only magnifies the dreaded day when the pig goes missing for good. I want my son to be happy. But cookies and missing pigs only prove how fitfully temporal these measures are. So what will it take? I’m quite sure the answer doesn’t lie at Toys R Us. More »
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    Time Paid Member

    Between the Buddhist calendar, which dates the coming year at approximately 2543, and Buddhist teachings that speak of "beginningless time" in which the whole of the past and future exist only in the present moment, the millennium blitz seems to have drawn us into its illusory phenomenon of a linear, Western, short-term sense of time, as encapsulated as a cuckoo clock. Yet we in the West are not without our own sense of infinite time,� More »
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    The Pleasure Paradox Paid Member

    Why we persist in pursuing the very things that fail to bring us happiness—a core issue in Buddhism—is also of great interest to researchers like Daniel Gilbert, professor of psychology at Harvard University. Gilbert, whose book Stumbling on Happiness will be published by Knopf in April 2006, took time out on the eve of his wedding to talk with Tricycle contributing editor Joan Duncan Oliver about “miswanting” and how it hampers our efforts to be happy. More »
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    Green Dharma Paid Member

    At a time when our environment is under assault as never before, the Buddha’s teachings on interdependence remind us that we humans are not separate from the world our activities are decimating. Our babies will drink in our breast milk the toxins we spray on our vegetable fields. The computer we toss on the garbage heap - outmoded after a year of use - will leach deadly chemicals into our groundwater. But Buddhism also reminds us that the natural world� More »
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    Facing Fear Paid Member

    Fear is perfectly natural, with its roots lying deep in the survival instinct. All living beings, from the simplest amoeba to some of the most realized beings on the planet will have some form of aversive reaction to external threats. More »
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    Clouds and Water: The Monastic Imperative Paid Member

    It has been said that without monasticism there is no Buddhism. When the first Sangha began to grow around the Buddha there was, of course, no distinctly “Buddhist” form of monastic practice. The history of the Buddhist monastic conventions begins with Shakyamuni’s modifications of the matrix provided by Indian monasticism. The changes he made in the models he received reflected his appreciation of his students’ needs of as well as the realities of his culture and society. More »