special section

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    An Interview With Geshe Kelsang Gyatso Paid Member

    Professor Donald Lopez: What is the importance of dharmapala (Dharma protector) practice in Tibetan Buddhism? Geshe Kelsang Gyatso (GKG): Although dharmapalas appear wrathful, in reality they are the same as buddhas and bodhisattvas. In order to benefit people and spiritual practitioners, buddhas and bodhisattvas emanate in the form of dharmapalas. Each monastery and practitioner regards their own dharmapala practice as very important because they practice this in their daily life and it has been passed down from generation to generation. Lopez: Can you describe what the actual practice might look like? Does it take the form of prostrations, or mantras or visualizations? More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The Great Conversion Paid Member

    AS AN UNTOUCHABLE BOY in village India at the turn of the century, Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar (1891-1956) was forced to sit silently on a piece of burlap at the back of his classroom; his notebooks could not be handled by the teacher, and drinking water was poured into his mouth to avoid physical contact. Like the other boys from the Mahar community of untouchables, he was beaten if he accidentally touched a caste Hindu. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    An Interview With Thubten Jigme Norbu Paid Member

    Lopez: What is the role of “protector deities” in Tibetan Buddhism? More »
  • Tricycle Community 7 comments

    Schooling Our Intention Paid Member

    How can we engage in action on behalf of earth and not get consumed, not go crazy? We who have aligned ourselves with this effort to transform a civilization so that complex forms of life can continue are faced with something very different from the kinds of challenges that our foremothers and forefathers faced. I'd like to begin by reflecting on some peculiarities of our situation in the twilight of the twentieth century here on planet earth. Six occur to me. First of all, there is the staggering range of the crisis, from the soil to the forest to the air to the seas to the rivers to the spasms of extinction. It's overwhelming for any single pair of eyes. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Positive Disintegration Paid Member

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Facing Loss Paid Member

    We all know what it is like to lose something: love, friendships, identity, opportunity, pets, homes, our hair. And although we know that impermanence is a fact of life, each loss still hits us afresh, almost as if we had never lost anything before. We feel empty, angry, desperate, uncertain—and lost ourselves. It's easy enough to say "This too shall pass," but what about the pain we're feeling right here, right now? More »