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    Dogs of Buddha Paid Member

    I On a shelf above a wide bedsit two Chinese-green jade Fu dogs;Shishi, lion dogs, Japanese people call them.As centuries drifted by, pairs replaceda solitary guardian, protectorof Buddhist altars, temples,graveyards, Imperial thrones, prosperous homes. This is a special pair:His mouth is open andhe cries, “A. . . U. . .,”Her mouth is closedover, “. . . mmm. . . .” Alpha and Omega.Buddha Mind.Aummm. II More »
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    Dog(ma) Paid Member

    Although I have on occasion glimpsed what I took to be the light of wisdom in some mutt’s orbs, and while I’m convinced that when asked if a dog had Buddha-nature, Master Joshu answered not wu but wuf, I’ve been disinclined to take a dog as my guru—for the simple reason that dogs are the most deeply domesticated of animals and I prefer my teachers free and wild. More »
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    Does a Dog Have Buddha-Nature? Paid Member

    When a scholar of Zen Buddhism has a dog called Mu, as I do, people think they know why. But things are not always what they seem, and my black lab’s name does not come from the famous koan “Mu.” It derives, rather, from Mustafa—the name given him at the humane society when he was picked up as a stray puppy. Mustafa soon became Musty and then just Mu. . . his Buddha-nature was never in question. More »
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    Kukkuripa, The Dog Lover Paid Member

    In Kapilavastu there lived a Brahmin named Kukkuripa. Puzzling over the problems of existence, he came to place his trust in the Tantra, and in time chose the path of renunciation. He began his itinerant career by begin his way slowly toward the caves of Lumbini. One day, on the road to the next town, he heard a soft whining in the underbrush. When he investigated, he found a young dog so starved he could no longer stand. Moved to pity, he picked her up and carried her with him on his long journey, sharing the contents of his begging bowl, and watching with delight as she began to grow strong and healthy. More »
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    Where To Study? Paid Member

    AS INTEREST IN BUDDHISM continues to grow in America, many people are choosing to deepen their understanding of this tradition through graduate level study. If you are contemplating this route, one of the first things to examine is your motivation for pursuing an advanced degree in this field. Is it to complement a Buddhist practice? Is it to build a career in academia? Most graduate programs in Buddhist studies do not serve as a substitute for the faith in, and the practice of, Buddhism. Rather, they approach Buddhism from analytical vantage points: from history, sociology, philology, philosophy, religious studies, and cultural studies. More »
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    Special Section: Vast Time Paid Member

    Between the Buddhist Calendar, which dates the coming year at approximately 2543, and Buddhist teachings that speak of “beginningless time” in which the whole of the past and future exist only in the present moment, the millennium blitz seems to have drawn us into its illusory phenomenon of a linear, short-term sense of time, as encapsulated as a cuckoo clock. Yet we in the West are not without our own sense of infinite time, and we look to science, art, and poetry to articulate it. To reflect on where the millennium falls within vast time, Tricycle invited scientists, whose work ranges from mitochondria slime molds to astrophysics, to contribute short essays on where the year 2000 registers, if at all, in terms of their own work. More »