reviews

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Book Reviews Paid Member

    Cleansing the Doors of Perception The Religious Significance of Entheogenic Plants and Chemicals Huston Smith Tarcher/Putnam: New York, 2000 173 pp.; $22.95 (hardcover) Allan Hunt-Badiner At eighty-one, Huston Smith is one of the most respected authorities on world religions. He has devoted his life to the study of Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Hinduism. He says he believes in all of them. So it may come as a surprise to some that an issue of great fascination to him over the last forty years of his life has been the spiritual use of drugs. Smith says that, given his age, he may have thought and written more on this subject than anyone else alive. He professes total agreement with Aldous Huxley’s opinion that “nothing is more important than the role mind-altering plants and chemicals have played in human history.” More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Sorrow Mountain Paid Member

    Ani Pachen was born in 1933, the daughter of a powerful local chieftain in the great, wild expanses of eastern Tibet. Soon after her twenty-first birthday, as the Chinese invasion thundered through her countryside, Pachen's father died, leaving her in charge of her family and the freedom fighters he commanded. Overnight, she became one of the few female leaders of the resistance movement until she, her family, and hundreds of her kinsmen and neighbors were finally captured and imprisoned. For more than twenty years she endured relentless torture, enforced labor, and near starvation in Chinese work camps. But Pachen's legacy of grit and defiance, as well as her single-minded devotion to the Buddha's teachings, helped her survive, and, ultimately, to escape to India, where she ordained as a nun and met His Holiness the Dalai Lama. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Summer Reading: some recommendations Paid Member

    Wes Nisker author of Buddha's Nature: A Practical Guide to Discovering Your Place in the Cosmos (Bantam Doubleday Dell Publications, 2000) I'm reading Seven Life Lessons of Chaos: Spiritual Wisdom from the Science of Change, by John Briggs and F. David Peat (Harper Perennial Library, 2000), as well as a novel called Moonlight on the Avenue of Faith, by Gina Barkhordar Nahai (Washington Square Press, 2000), and a memoir, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, by Dave Eggers (Simon & Schuster, 2000). As for Buddhist books, I'm continually dipping into The Words of My Perfect Teacher, by Patrul Rinpoche (Shambhala Publications, 1998). Dr. Mark Epstein author of Going to Pieces without Falling Apart (Broadway Books, 1998) More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Book Reviews Paid Member

    � More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Books Paid Member

    WHAT SHOULD I READ? Marital Arts: A Review of The Tale of the Incomparable Prince Tulku ThondupEdited by Harold TalbottShambhala Publications: Boston, 1996.383 pp., $35 (cloth).John Giorno More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Books in Brief Paid Member

    Burton Watson, an occasional professor at Columbia University and a regular resident of Japan, is a prolific and masterful translator of Chinese and Japanese. His earliest works appeared in the sixties and were translations of Chinese classics, ranging from the Records of the Grand Historian of China (Columbia University Press, 1961) to The Complete Works of Chuang Tzu (Columbia University Press: 1968). But in addition to translations of histories, prose, and Taoist texts, there are at least half a dozen publications of Watson's translations of Chinese and Japanese poetry, all of which remain in print. More »