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    Pictures Worth a Thousand Words Paid Member

    The Buddha and Buddhist culture have inspired centuries of artists and, more recently, photographers. Buddha (Welcome Books, 2003, $29.95 cloth) contains 155 color photographs by Jon Ortner, from the giant gold Maha Muni Buddha in Mandalay—said to be the only image of Gautama made in his lifetime—to a fourteenth-century Siamese stone Buddha head ensnared in the roots of a bodhi tree. The satin-bound gift book includes informative captions, sayings of the Buddha, and an introduction by Vipassana teacher Jack Kornfield, a former Thai monk. More »
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    Open Up Paid Member

    ONE CITY: A DECLARATION OF INTERDEPENDENCEEthan NichternBoston: Wisdom Publications, 2007224 pp.; $15.95 (paper) More »
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    'Secret Tibet' by Fosco Maraini Paid Member

    Secret TibetFosco MarainiThe Harvill Press: London, 2001425 pp.; $35 (cloth)There is something about traveling in Tibet that makes Westerners reach for their pens. But of the literally dozens of travelers who have described their Tibetan adventures, few have possessed Fosco Maraini’s talent for writing. Maraini describing his bus journey across town would be enjoyable enough; to read his evocative account of traveling in Tibet is a real pleasure. His style, a blend of poetic speculation and careful observation, might well be described as “Herman Hesse meets Bruce Chatwin,” and like a great composer, he knows when to expand a theme and when to leave space for the listener’s own imagination. More »
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    A Hard Pill To Swallow Paid Member

    Infinite Life:Seven Virtues for Living WellRobert ThurmanNew York: Riverhead, 2004304 pp.; $24.95 (cloth) With Infinite Life, Robert Thurman, the charismatic and controversial Tibetan Buddhist scholar, offers what may become his most influential book to date. Probably because he’s taught Buddhism to college students for so long, Thurman has a knack for using metaphors from Western culture to explain Buddhist concepts. When inviting readers to embrace the notion of immortality—a hard sell even to many longtime practitioners—Thurman refers to the popular movie The Matrix. He likens himself to Morpheus, the rebel leader who offers Neo, the latest recruit in the battle to free humanity, a fresh perspective on life: More »
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    Kung Fu HQ Paid Member

    Shaolin’s story More »