reviews

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Are There Yaks and Vultures in America? Paid Member

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The Zen of Living and Dying and Lessons from the Dying Paid Member

    The Zen of Living and Dying A Practical and Spiritual Guide Philip Kapleau Shambhala: Boston, 1998 288 pp., $15.95 (paper) Lessons from the Dying Rodney Smith Wisdom Publications: Boston, 1998 224 pp., $16.95 (paper) For a man writing about the Great Unknown, Philip Kapleau seems oddly knowing. He tells us, for instance, of the nine parts that constitute consciousness according to Buddhist psychology, and states that three of them - the seat of I-awareness, the storehouse consciousness, and the formless Self-consciousness - survive death. He also describes the steps these parts go through in the intermediate phase between death and rebirth; yet in a copiously footnoted text, these passages are not referenced, leading to the obvious question: How do you know? The great teachers taught it, I suppose. But how did they know? More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Horrors Paid Member

    THE BLOB IRVIN S. YEAWORTH, JR., DIRECTOR Paramount Pictures, 1958 $39.95 (DVD) SPIDER BABY JACK HILL, DIRECTOR American General Pictures, Inc., 1964 $14.99 (DVD) “NOW ON THE EIGHTH DAY the blood-drinking wrathful deities will appear. Recognize them without being distracted. . . . Glorious Great Buddha-Heruka will emerge from within your own brain . . . with three heads, six arms, and four legs spread wide apart. . . . His nine eyes gaze into yours with a wrathful expression, his eyebrows are like flashes of lightning, his teeth gleam like copper. . . . His body is garlanded with black serpents and fresh skulls. . . .” More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    In-Body Experience Paid Member

    Gesture of Awareness: A Radical Approach to Time, Space, and Movementby Charles GenoudBoston: Wisdom Publications, 2006224 pp.; $16.95 (paper) The body gets a bad rap. It’s often regarded as the spirit’s clumsy, needy, smelly, ever-present, possibly dangerous roommate. The poet Delmore Schwartz called it “The heavy bear who goes with me . . . / A caricature, a swollen shadow, / A stupid clown of the spirit’s motive.” More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Book Reviews - Winter 1993 Paid Member

    SELF AND LIBERATION: The Jung/Buddhism Dialogue Edited by Daniel Meckel and Robert L. MoorePaulist Press: New York, 1992. 338 pp., $19.95 (paper). Michele Martin AFTER DECADES of exchange, many Buddhist practitioners and an increasing number of psychologists agree that the two traditions can benefit one another. The ongoing question remains: How? Answers to this depend on a clear knowledge of each other's position. Within the lungian world, therapists such as lames Hillman and Clarissa Pinkola Estes are creatively questioning and reshaping their inheritance, which includes, however, Jung's often idiosyncratic writings about the East. This new volume brings together material that allows for a more precise understanding and evaluation of Jung's relation to what he understood Buddhism to be. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Meditate On This Paid Member

    If you missed “The Circle of Bliss: Buddhist Meditational Art” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art last fall, you can catch it at the Columbus (Ohio) Museum of Art this spring, through May 9. And if Ohio isn’t in your travel plans, you can have nearly as transforming an experience by perusing the exhibition catalog, The Circle of Bliss: Buddhist Meditational Art (Columbus Museum of Art and Serindia Publications, 2003, $90 cloth). Prepared by curators John C. More »