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    Books in Brief Paid Member

    FUNDAMENTAL MIND MI-PAM-GYA-TSO; COMMENTARY BY KHETSUN SANGPO RINBOCHAY; JEFFREY HOPKINS, TRANS. Snow Lion Publications, 2006 175 pp.; $16.95 (paper) IN HIS INSIGHTFUL and practical commentary on Mipham Gyatso’s The Meaning of Fundamental Mind, Clear Light, senior Nyingma lama Khetsun Sangpo Rinpoche explores the difference between mistaken mind—with which we engage in all our daily activities—and the fundamental mind of buddhas. Fundamental Mind begins with the biography of Mipham Gyatso (1846-1912), tracing the Tibetan scholar-yogi’s journey from a childhood in Kham to his position as one of the leaders of the Rime movement. Translated and edited by leading scholar Jeffrey Hopkins, this collaboration is a valuable introduction to the concept of fundamental mind. More »
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    'Dakini's Warm Breath' by Judith Simmer-Brown Paid Member

    Dakini's Warm BreathThe Feminine Principle in Tibetan Buddhism Judith Simmer-Brown Shambhala Publications: Boston, 2001 352 pp.; $29.95 (cloth)If you took the Virgin Mary in all her apparitions—from the carpenter’s gentle wife through the radiant Madonna to the transfigured miracle-maker—and gave her full angelic powers, you’d then have to add Athena, Aphrodite, Medusa, the race of Amazons, the Sirens and Muses, together with all the wicked witches, jealous fairies, and evil stepmothers that you could dredge from western lore, and even then you wouldn’t have equaled the multidimensionality of Tibet’s dakini. More »
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    Treasures in Translation Paid Member

    For Sarah Harding, a translator of Vajrayana texts and longtime Buddhist practitioner, the invitation was irresistible: to spend a year in Bhutan preparing a book on Pema Lingpa (1450-1521), one of Tibetan Buddhism’s five most important tertöns (treasure-revealers), and a national folk hero to the Bhutanese. Harding’s translation, The Life and Revelations of Pema Lingpa (Snow Lion, 2003; $14.95 paper), is the first to make Pema Lingpa’s terma, or treasures, available in English. The texts—taken from Lama Jewel Ocean (Lama Norbu Gyatso), one of the most important cycles in Pema Lingpa’s twenty-one-volume treasure collection—contain fundamental instructions from Padmasambhava, the eighth-century scholar who brought Buddhism to the Himalayan region and is revered as their highest teacher, Guru Rinpoche. More »
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    Yoda-Dharma Paid Member

    The Dharma of Star WarsMatthew BortolinBoston: Wisdom Publications, 2005205 pp.; $14.95 (paper) The Dharma of Dragons and Daemons:Buddhist Themes in Modern FantasyDavid R. Loy and Linda GoodhewBoston: Wisdom Publications, 2004128 pp.; $14.95 (paper) It’s been awfully hard to avoid Star Wars this year. The series of films that began in 1977 finally ended with the release in May of the final installment, Revenge of the Sith. But if you don’t know this by now, you must be living in a faraway galaxy yourself, or attending a very, very secluded retreat. More »
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    Cultivating Compassion Paid Member

    This book is different from your earlier books, so much so that the press release actually refers to it as your first book. Well, it’s actually my twenty-eighth book. Most of my other books have been academic, seven of them for the Dalai Lama, working with him to produce works of his own. I wanted to do a book about compassion that spoke in my own voice and used my own life and experiences as a means to get the message across; it’s not a thousand-page treatise on emptiness!Why have you written this book now? More »
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    Everyday Nirvana Paid Member

    The end of the questAt last: a seeker’s guide to the end of seeking, put together by former “full-time seeker” Josh Baran. 365 Nirvana Here and Now: Living Every Moment in Enlightenment (Thorsons/Element, 2003, $19.95 cloth) contains passages from more than 265 sources, representing Eastern and Western wisdom of the past three thousand years. The range is vast—the Buddha to Martin Buber, Nagarjuna to Alice Walker, Krishnamurti to a Cherokee grandmother—but there is a common theme: “The main insight,” Baran says, “is that the awakened state—nirvana—is our natural condition, available at any moment to any one of us.” The 365 selections can be read in sequence for a year’s worth of daily inspiration, or dipped into at random to reel oneself back to the present. More »