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    Books in Brief Fall 2001 Paid Member

    Letting Go:The Story of Zen Master Tosui Translated, with an introduction by Peter HaskelUniv. of Hawai'i Press: Honolulu, 2001 184 pp.; $19.95 (paper) Here is the first translation of Menzan Zuiho's Tribute, the biography of eccentric Zen master Tosui Unkei. Tosui abandoned the religious establishment after thirty years of srudy to lead an itinerant life among the common people of seventeenth-century Japan. The volume is enhanced by twenty original woodblock prints from the 1768 edition. The Places That Scare You: More »
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    'A New Religious America' and 'The Transformation of American Religion' Paid Member

    A New Religious America:How a Christian Country Has Become the World's Most Diverse Nationby Diana L. EckHarperSanFrancisco, 2001320 pp.; $26.00 (cloth) The Transformation of American Religion: The Story of a Late-Twentieth-Century Awakening by Amanda Porterfield Oxford University Press, 2001 262 pp.; $27.50 (cloth) More »
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    Aural Transmission Paid Member

    In the cacophonous world of audio publishing, a sixteen-year-old Coloradobased company, Sounds True, is a clear voice of dharma. Its list includes nearly every English-speaking Buddhist teacher of note and this fall, Sounds True is offering its entire Buddhist inventory in a new catalog, Dharma Talk, that mixes feature articles and staff recommendations with product descriptions. The handsomely packaged audio sets include new programs by Stephen Batchelor (Buddhism Without Beliefs), Mark Epstein (What the Buddha Felt), Tara Brach (Radical Self-Acceptance), and Natalie Goldberg with her Zen teacher, Dosho (Zen Howl). More »
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    Books in Brief Summer 2011 Paid Member

    In 1982, Peter Matthiessen traveled to Japan with his teacher, Bernie Glassman, to pay respects to the masters in their Zen lineage. Matthiessen, a two-time winner of the National Book Award, chronicled their pilgrimage in Nine-Headed Dragon River: Zen Journals 1969–1982. A new book, Are We There Yet? A Zen Journey Through Space and Time (Counterpoint, 2010, 160 pp., paper, $29.95), takes Matthiessen’s account of that trip from Nine-Headed Dragon River and places it next to photographs shot by Peter Cunningham, who was also along for the ride. It’s a stellar combination. Matthiessen’s luminous prose, which sheds light on both their pilgrimage and important historical Zen figures, is made even more enlightening by Cunningham’s stunning black-and-white images. More »
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    Echoes of the Past: The Buddhist Cave Temples of Xiantangshan Paid Member

    The Xiantangshan cave temples in northern China, constructed during the short-lived Northern Qi dynasty (550–577 C.E.), are still used as places of worship. But the artworks they once contained—carved friezes depicting Buddhist deities and their mandalas, limestone statues of relaxed bodhisattvas and intent disciples, and incised decorative panels lavishly patterned with flowering trees and flaming jewels—are largely missing, looted during the first part of the 20th century to satisfy a growing demand for such material. More »
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    A Dream-Over at the Rubin Museum of Art Paid Member

    On a recent Saturday evening, 80 people with pajamas peeking from beneath their overcoats filed down West 17th Street in New York City and slipped through the doors of the Rubin Museum of Art. In the lobby, tea lights flickered and soothing music played. In the galleries above, great works of Himalayan art awaited the guests, who would spend that night sleeping— and, hopefully, dreaming—in their shadows. More »