reviews

  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    In Search for the Panchen Lama Paid Member

    The Search for the Panchen Lama Isabel Hiltion W.W. Norton and Co.: New York, 2000 336 pp.; $25.95 (cloth) More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    In Search for the Panchen Lama Paid Member

    The Search for the Panchen Lama Isabel Hiltion W.W. Norton and Co.: New York, 2000 336 pp.; $25.95 (cloth) More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The Spiritual Path Paid Member

    The Spiritual Path Han F. de Wit Duquesne University Press: Pittsburgh, 1999 312 pp.; $21.95 Han de Wit's earlier book, Contemplative Psychology, served two main purposes: First, a theoretical analysis was undertaken that brought the contemplative thinking of the world’s religious traditions into a common frame of reference; second, the contemplative understanding of human psychology was led into provacitive dialogue with the Western academic and clinical psychology traditions. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Thunder and Lightning Paid Member

    Thunder and Lightning Cracking Open the Writer’s Craft Natalie Goldberg Bantam: New York, 2000 384 pp.; $24.95 (cloth) More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    In Search of the Medicine Buddha Paid Member

    In Search of the Medicine Buddha A Himalayan Journey David Crow Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam: New York, 2000 370 pp.; $24.95 Books on Asian medicine easily fall prey to the Exotic East problem, causing them too often to resemble those blissful magazine spreads on places like Timphur or Lahore: the details are extraordinary, but suspect in their perfection. With skill and unclouded vision, David Crow does not romanticize the complexities out of his subject, which is what makes in Search of the Medicine Buddha such an invaluable book for anyone interested in Eastern medicine. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Bones of the Master Paid Member

    In 1959 a young Ch'an monk named Tsung Tsai escapes the Red Army troops who destmy his monastery and flees from the edge of the Gobi Desert to Hong Kong Hunted, starving, and knowing that his fellow monks are dead, Tsung Tsai is borne up by his mission: to canyon the teachings of his elderly master, who remained in his mountain to cave high above the monastery. Almost thirty years later, during a snowstorm outside Woodstock, New York, Tsung Tsai meets up with his irreverent American neighbor, a libertine poet named George Crane. In the first part of Bones of the Master, Crane mixes his own witty and lyrical prose with Tsung Tsai's wondelfully eccentric rendition of English to retell the monk’s escape from Communist China. Subsequently, Tsung Tsai persuades Crane to accompany him on a return pilgrimage to Inner Mongolia to find his teacher's bones and to provide a proper burial for his master. More »