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    Cultivating the Empty Field: The Silent Illumination of Zen Master Hongzhi Paid Member

    Cultivating the Empty Field: The Silent Dlumination of Zen Master HongzhiTranslated by Taigen Daniel Leighton with Yi Wu. North Point Press: San Francisco, 1991.91 pp. $11.95 (paperback). More »
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    Dharma Doors Paid Member

    The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha More »
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    Books in Brief Summer 2014 Paid Member

    Buddhist writer Clark Strand is disillusioned with American Buddhism. That is, he avows, with the exception of Soka Gakkai International (SGI), the world’s largest lay Buddhist institution, whose presence has been steadily growing on American shores as well as abroad. Founded in Japan in 1930, the organization now boasts 12 million members in 192 countries. In Waking the Buddha (Middleway Press, May 2014, $14.95, 192 pp., paper), Strand suggests SGI as a role model for any religious institution seeking to thrive in the 21st century. More »
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    Dharma Drunks Paid Member

      Refuge Recovery: A Buddhist Path to Recovering from AddictionNoah LevineHarperOne, June 2014 288 pp.; $16.99 cloth More »
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    Only Fiction Paid Member

    In Paradise: A NovelBy Peter MatthiessenRiverhead Books, 2014256 pp.; $27.95 cloth More »
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    Books in Brief Spring 2014 Paid Member

    In Search of the Christian Buddha: How an Asian Sage Became a Medieval Saint (W. W. Norton, April 2014, $24.95, 224 pp., cloth), by Donald S. Lopez, Jr. and Peggy McCracken, traces the Buddha’s story as it came to be rewritten by Muslim, Jewish, and Christian authors. As the tale was translated from Sanskrit (or another Indian language) into Middle Persian, then into Arabic, then by the Christians into Georgian and, not long after, into Greek, its most salient cross-cultural tropes—prophecy of a prince’s future, encounter with the world beyond the palace walls, and renunciation of worldly pleasures—were reinterpreted according to each author's religion and cultural concerns. The various iterations, therefore, offered very different lessons. More »