on practice

  • Tricycle Community 27 comments

    Nonopposition Paid Member

    Although everyone has the potential for compassion, some people seem to be our enemies. How should we react to them? Shakyamuni Buddha encountered many people who wanted to harm him during his life, but he was never angry with them, nor did he try to overpower or dominate them. Instead he treated them compassionately and tried to help them. Both Buddhism in general and Ch’an [Chinese Zen] in particular condemn fighting and advocate nonopposition to one’s enemies. A true practitioner responds with nonopposition to obstructions caused by people, situations, and the environment, and lets go of any tension she may feel. She does not resist or fight with difficulties.More »
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    Loving the Enemy Paid Member

    •As a mother would risk her lifeto protect her only child, even so should one cultivate a limitless heart with regard to all beings. With goodwill for the entire cosmos, cultivate a limitless heart: Above, below, and all around, unobstructed, without hostility or hate. Whether standing, walking, sitting, or lying down, as long as one is alert, one should be resolved on this mindfulness. This is called a sublime abiding here and now. —The Buddha,from Sutta Nipata 1.8 • More »
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    The Second Arrow Paid Member

    "When touched with a feeling of pain,the ordinary uninstructed personsorrows, grieves,and laments, beats his breast,becomes distraught.So he feels two pains,physical and mental.Just as if they were to shoot a manwith an arrow and,right afterward,were to shoot him with another one,so that he would feelthe pains of two arrows..." —the Buddha Image: Tibetan medical painting illustrating sowa rigpa, the ancient Tibetan "science of healing." From the Blue Beryl, a 17th century Tibetan medical text. More »
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    The Practice of Nonpreference Paid Member

    Nothing I had learned in my years of Zen sitting practice and innumerable retreats had prepared me for the ordeal of developing rheumatoid arthritis in my seventh year of practice. Overwhelmed by the power of pain, I could do little else but surrender to the pure physicality of my existence. I wouldn't have chosen to explore consciousness on such a visceral level, bur once I was forced to, I discovered that there were other experiences waiting to be noticed. More »
  • Tricycle Community 7 comments

    When It Happens to Us Paid Member

    This is a fact of life; we don't like pain. We suffer because we marry our instinctive aversion to pain to the deep-seated belief that life should be free from pain. In resisting our pain by holding this belief, we strengthen just what we're trying to avoid. When we make pain the enemy, we solidify it. This resistance is where our suffering begins. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    At Home In Our Bodies Paid Member

    Can Buddhist practice liberate us from the prison of physical pain? How can meditation help when medicine falls short? Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph. D., professor emeritus of medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, speaks to these questions as a longtime practitioner of Buddhist meditation and hatha yoga, and as a pioneer in the use of mindfulness to treat chronic pain and illness. More than 13,000 people have visited the world-renowned Stress Reduction Clinic that Kabat-Zinn established in 1979 at the UMass Medical Center, and the eight-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program—described in Kabat-Zinn's bestseller Full Catastrophe Living—is now also offered at some two hundred other medical facilities worldwide. More »