on practice

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    Tying The Knot Paid Member

    Judy Lief: If the Buddhist path has to do with overcoming attachment, then it might seem odd for a Buddhist to consider adding the complications of marriage and family to her life. But in my experience it is the complications, not my neurotic attempts at smoothness, that have benefited my practice the most. These complications have been many and varied, including marriage, family obligations, motherhood, sickness, work, travel, and teaching. More »
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    Dana: The Practice of Giving Paid Member

    Dana (pronounced “DAH-nuh”), noun. Sanskrit, Pali, roughly “gift, alms, donation”; voluntary giving of materials, energy, or wisdom (dharma) to others; generosity; regarded as one of the most important Buddhist virtues. Simple acts of giving—whether material, emotional, or spiritual—are often riddled with ambivalence arising from craving and attachment. This section provides suggestions for our most common dana dilemmas and poses questions to help you determine where you are on the path to true generosity. Read all the articles on our special section on dana: More »
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    Bowing Paid Member

                                   After zazen we bow to the floor nine times. By bowing we are giving up ourselves. To give up ourselves means to give up our dualistic ideas. So there is no difference between zazen practice and bowing. Usually to bow means to pay our respects to something which is more worthy of respect than ourselves. But when you bow to Buddha you should have no idea of Buddha, you just become one with Buddha, you are already Buddha himself. When you become one with Buddha, one with everything that exists, you find the true meaning of being. When you forget all your dualistic ideas, everything becomes your teacher, and everything can be the object of worship. More »
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    Breathing Paid Member

    "What we call 'I' is just a swinging door which moves when we inhale and when we exhale. " More »
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    How to Sit Paid Member

    1. Sit on the forward third of a chair or cushion. 2. Arrange your legs in a position you can maintain comfortably. In the Half Lotus position, place your left leg on your right thigh (or vice versa). In the Full Lotus position, put your feet on opposite thighs. You may also sit simply with your legs tucked in close to your body, but be sure that your weight is distributed on three points: both of your knees on the ground and your buttocks on the round cushion. On a chair, keep your knees apart about the width of your shoulders, feet firmly planted on the floor. More »
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    The Precepts: A Special Practice Section Paid Member

    The Buddhist Precepts: An IntroductionMartine Bachelor More »